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Journal Metrics live on Scopus

on Thu, 07/02/2015 - 14:00

Last week, we announced that the 2014 journal metrics values were launched and freely available on www.journalmetrics.com. This week, we’re happy to report that the 2014 Journal Metrics values for the Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP), SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) and Impact per Publication (IPP) are now live on Scopus.com. The values have been updated into Scopus for the Compare journals and Browse Sources pages, as well as on the Public Title List that is available on the Scopus info site. The new data provides 2014 citation performance metrics for 22,639 serials in all subjects in science, social sciences and the arts and humanities.

All journals included in Scopus receive journal metric values and the extensive, global coverage of Scopus allows many journals that do not have an Impact Factor to view and understand their role in the scholarly publication landscape. All Scopus-based journal metric values are available for free at www.journalmetrics.com or via the Public Title

Release Date: 
July 2 2015

QS renews agreement to use Scopus data for its World University Ranking

on Thu, 06/18/2015 - 08:57

We have some great news to share on the Scopus front! QS, a global leader in university rankings, and Elsevier today announced their decision to renew their long-term collaboration. As part of the agreement, QS will continue to use Scopus data for its flagship World University Ranking, QS Top 50 Under 50, QS University Rankings for Asia, BRICs and Latin America.

This is truly an endorsement of the work team Scopus has done over the last 11 years – improving the quality of the Scopus database with a focus on increasing the breadth and depth of globally relevant coverage. Want to learn more about more about how Scopus is is improving? Check out these posts on how we are expanding historical and books coverage and read more about updates to our user interface.

“QS was the first of the global rankings compilers to identify Scopus as an excellent source of data to assess research activity and excellence of universities globally," explains Ben Sowter, Head of the QS Intelligence Unit.

2014 SNIP, SJR and IPP journal metrics now freely available online

on Wed, 06/17/2015 - 12:13

We’re pleased to announce that the 2014 journal metrics values are now freely available via JournalMetrics.com. The values will be visible in Scopus.com as of our next release which is scheduled for June 24, 2015.

It's impossible for one metric to serve all the necessary purposes – a mix of quantitative and qualitative evaluation is needed. When evaluating the performance of a journal, a variety of measures must be considered, of which citation analysis is only a part. An ideal “basket of metrics” contains measures that reflect the many ways a journal can demonstrate excellence, and, finally, individual assessment of the value of a journal’s contribution will require a mix of quantitative and qualitative evaluation.

All journals included in Scopus receive journal metric values and the extensive, global coverage of Scopus allows many journals that do not have an Impact Factor to view and understand their role in the scholarly publication landscape.

Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board meets in Russia

on Wed, 05/27/2015 - 11:50

It's that time of year again for our Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board meeting (CSAB)! The CSAB reviews all titles that are suggested to Scopus and works closely with the product and marketing

team to understand how Scopus is used, what content is relevant for users, and what enhancements should be made to Scopus content. The board is comprised of 14 Subject Chairs -- an international group of scientists, researchers, and librarians -- who each represent a specific major subject field(s). The recommendations of the CSAB directly influences the overall direction of Scopus and the prioritization of new content requests to ensure that Scopus stays international and relevant for the global research community.

So why are we in Russia? Yesterday, 3 of our Subject Chairs, Peter Miller, Dr. David Rew and Karen Holland, gave a presentation and advice to Russian editors at NEICON's 4th International Scientific and Practical Conference > World-Class Scientific Publication 2015: Current

Analyze thousands of search results in less than a minute

on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 17:43

The Analyze search results tool

The next time you search in Scopus, gain more insight into your results by using the <Analyze search results> feature located at the top of your search results page. It provides a visual analysis of your results broken up into 7 categories (year, source, author, affiliation, country/territory, document type and subject area).

For example, let’s say you want to know which organizations are producing the most content about “wearable technology.” You run your search, which results in a list of over 4,000 publications. But then you click on <Analyze search results>, open the <Affiliation’ tab>, and find your answer—all in about 30 seconds. Then you decide to browse the other tabs and discover that 54.8% of the documents matching your results are from Conference Papers, helping you isolate the most cutting-edge research. <Analyze search results> provides a quick and effective way of breaking down and understanding your search results to guide you to the information you’re looking for.

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, a post about the h-index from just over a year ago continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus since last year, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index is no longer limited to post-1995 data, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the

Scopus launches annual journal re-evaluation process to maintain content quality

on Wed, 05/06/2015 - 08:26

Since Scopus’ launch in 2004, more than 56 million records have been added to the database. The content originally came from different sources (in-house databases like Embase, ScienceDirect and Compendex, the Scopus Title Suggestion Form and Medline) and has undergone different levels of Scopus content evaluation. This, together with the fact that the title evaluation criteria have evolved over time to become more strict, has led to a situation where some journals no longer meet the Scopus quality criteria.

As high content quality is very important to Scopus, and as an incentive for journals to maintain their high content quality, the title re-evaluation process has been implemented. Six quality metrics and benchmarks have been put in place which are the basis of the re-evaluation process, please find them in the below table. These criteria have been developed with the Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board in conjunction with our Analytical Services team.

Journals not meeting

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