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Re-evaluation: Maintaining Scopus high-quality content

on Tue, 05/03/2016 - 02:29

Almost a year ago we announced the launch of the new Re-evaluation program for Scopus content. This program was created as an incentive for journals to maintain their high content quality. When a journal is originally suggested for Scopus, it must undergo a rigorous evaluation and selection process to ensure it meets all the high-quality title selection criteria required for acceptance into Scopus. However, journals must also demonstrate the ability to maintain their quality status year over year.

An additional focus for the first year of the re-evaluation program was to ensure all journals met the same baseline of quality standards. When Scopus launched in 2004, content originally came from different sources with different levels of evaluation.  Over time, evaluation criteria for new titles has evolved to become stricter and standardized.

Celebrating Earth Day: SciVal and Scopus investigate

on Fri, 04/22/2016 - 15:56

Today, April 22nd is Earth Day and we celebrate this day with a joint SciVal and Scopus infographic. Now in its 46th year, Earth Day aims to promote a healthy, sustainable environment, address climate change and protect the Earth for future generations.

In 2015, Elsevier’s Analytical Services team in collaboration with SciDev.Net wrote a report about the global research landscape that surrounds the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The Sustainability in Science report focused on 6 key themes, one of which was the “Planet”. In celebration of Earth Day, we used the same search terms for the “Planet” theme in both SciVal and Scopus to take a look at the researchers, institutions and countries working in sustainability science.

Check out the infographic available now on our info site.

Scopus undergoes testing to improve your search experience

on Thu, 04/14/2016 - 17:45

A few weeks ago, we posted on the importance of A/B testing and how it allows us to make better data-driven decisions about how to improve Scopus. In part two, we will focus on improvements to Scopus search that will start this coming week. This work will enable us to move forward with improvements to the search experience. For example, due to timing differences during processing, citation count values may appear to be different from (e.g. between search results and citation overview). This asynchronicity will be resolved once the changes are complete.

During this time, below are some of the things you may notice:

  • Search results: You might observe slight changes in the number of results returned. Or the ordering of results for the same search at different times (but not during a single session) could be different. Two different users at the same institution, or one person using multiple computers such as at home vs. at work, may see differences in search results.
  • Alerts and saved

6 simple search tips: Lessons learned from the Scopus Webinar

on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 22:20

Gillian Griffiths, Senior Scopus Product Manager and search specialist, recently held a webinar sharing "Scopus search tips to make your research more effective." In case you missed it, you can watch the recording here.

First, it’s important to know that the data in Scopus is highly structured; every piece of information is tagged, even down to the initials of the author in a reference inside an article’s list of references. This is what ensures that your search will be precise and return reliable results, and also differentiates Scopus from web search engines (watch minutes 00:09:30-00:12:43 to learn more).

As put by Gillian in the webinar, search is the process of "connecting the question in your head to the information inside the 61+ million items in Scopus."  So, what do you need to know in order to get the best results for your question? Here are 6 key things to keep in mind:

Corresponds to minutes 00:12:57-00:26:52 of the webcast:

1. Loose phrases vs. separate words

One of

A/B testing: Making Scopus Better (Part I)

on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:45

How are changes to Scopus determined, and how does your use of Scopus impact the development process? This post is the first of a two-part series in which we discuss A/B testing and how data analysis is

helping us improve Scopus.

There are multiple ways the Scopus team works to identify potential product changes, with a focus to bring you the best experience and provide information faster and with deeper insights. From listening to user feedback to investigating new technology and trends, the product team continuously works to both iterate on existing features and functionality and develop new enhancements.

For an A&I database like Scopus, which serves researchers, institutions, and corporations from all over the world with timely information from over 5000 publishers, there is not a single “typical” user. Each individual user has a specific need and an ideal way they would like the product to work.

How to discover key influencers and uncover trends from your Scopus search results

on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 07:28

Scopus indexes over 120,000 book titles; and, by using the <Analyze search results> tool in Scopus in tandem with searching book content, you can gain a powerful way of discovering key influencers and uncovering important trends. To demonstrate how this works, watch our video or follow the steps below:

 

 

For this example, let’s say you are looking to find broad-based content and subject area experts on economic behavior. Note: click on each image to enlarge

  1. Begin a search in Scopus for Economic Behavior

  1. The search returns over 69,000 document results. To make this a less intimidating number and isolate only book content, filter your results to <Books> on the left hand side, under the <Document type> parameter; and click on <Limit to>

  1. Next, sort by <Cited by> to quickly identify the most impactful books
  2. Begin scrolling through the list and click on <Show abstract> to read more about a book and decide whether it is relevant to your research needs

  1. Once you isolate a book that both relevant to

Webinar: SciVal economic indicators with guest speakers from Queensland University & Penn State

on Tue, 03/08/2016 - 18:48

"Patent citation metrics extends SciVal beyond scholarly output — they create a link between research and economic or commercial potential"  -- Michelle Hutnik, Penn State University

 

With the February 25th release, SciVal introduced new data types to help assess the economic impact of your research and provide a broader basket of metrics for more informed decision making. The new data types include:

  • Patent-article citations which provide a proxy for innovation and the potential to transfer that knowledge to industry
  • Scopus view counts now available in all modules to give you an immediate indication regarding the popularity of your research

Join the SciVal team, along with guest speakers from the University of Queensland and Penn State University, for an interactive webinar.

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