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The Nobel laureates in Scopus

on Thu, 10/30/2014 - 10:23

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes in Medicine, Physics, Chemistry and Economics have all published with Elsevier, making pioneering contributions to science and medicine. We are honored to work with these extraordinary scientists, who have also served as editors, editorial board members or reviewers for different Elsevier journals.

 

You can discover more about the Nobel laureates and their research by looking at their Author Profiles on Scopus and reading a selection of their output.

 

Medicine or Physiology

John O'Keefe - click to view his Scopus author profile

May-Britt Moser - click to view her Scopus author profile

Edvard Moser - click to view his Scopus author profile

Read a selection of their research papers

 

Physics

Isamu Akasaki - click to view his Scopus author profile

Hiroshi Amano - click to view his Scopus author profile

Shuji Nakamura - click to view his Scopus author profile

Read a selection of their research papers

 

Chemistry

Eric Betzig - click to view his Scopus author

Scopus Content Selection Advisory Board meeting commences

on Mon, 10/27/2014 - 23:50

The Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board meeting starts today and as always, we are looking forward to the lively discussion on topics such as: publication ethics, title evaluation processes, content expansion and ongoing content development programs such as the Cited References Expansion -- and much more.

 

Recently it has come to our attention that more clarity is needed regarding the work that the Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board does throughout the course of the year.

 

Board members are (independent!) experts in their respective fields and also experienced journal editors. Quality is their main criteria when selecting journals for Scopus coverage. In addition to their thorough work throughout the year, Subject Chairs meet twice per year to talk in-person about important issues in the scientific publishing community.

Scopus h-index being updated to include content from 1970 to the present

on Thu, 10/23/2014 - 22:08

The Scopus Cited Reference Expansion, announced in March, is well on its way. Our October 23 release saw the expansion of the h-index publication window to 1970. The previous publication window was from 1996 onwards.

 

As a result, the Scopus Author Profile page may show an increase of the h-index count for some authors. These changes in the h-index count are also visible in the author profile in “Analyze author output” h-index and the Cited by (citations) tab. Moreover, it also expanded the publication window of the “Citation Overview” tool.
 

Why was this done: The h-index timeframe has been lengthened to 1970 in preparation for the Cited References Expansion project. The first batch of pre-1996 cited references will start appearing in November.

 

What is the impact to the h-index: Prior to this release the h-index was only calculated using post-1995 publications. Authors that have published work prior to 1996 may now see an increase in their h-index, even though no pre-1996

Release Date: 
October 24 2014

Open Access on Scopus

on Wed, 10/22/2014 - 14:40

This week is Open Access Week 2014, a global event that gives the academic and research community an opportunity to learn more about Open Access. We thought it was worth noting that out of the  21,000+ journals indexed by Scopus, 2,800 are gold open access journals (DOAJ-registered). You can view these titles in the publicly-available Scopus title list.

 

Moreover, Scopus features other “open” features like our open author profiles – just google “free author lookup” to access them:

You can read more about the new Scopus author profile page here.

 

Also, don’t miss the chance to have a look at this selection of interesting open access research papers published in Elsevier journals on topics such as health, environment, personality and culture.

 

Interested in knowing more about Open Access Week? You can follow the latest news via the hashtag #OAWeek.

Reaxys links on Scopus currently disabled

on Mon, 10/13/2014 - 15:06

We are aware that Reaxys links on the abstract (document details) pages in Scopus are currently disabled. We are working to identify the problem and expect to have these links fixed as soon as possible, likely within the next few weeks. All other links are working as expected. Our sincere apologies for any inconvenience this may cause you.

 

As soon as we have the Reaxys links restored, we will post a notice on this blog. Please also follow us on Twitter@scopus for regular news and updates.

 

Release Date: 
October 13 2014

Scopus Content update: 50,000 books indexed

on Mon, 09/15/2014 - 11:27

Since our last content update in June, we’ve been busy moving the Scopus Books Expansion project along. To date, you can see more than 50,000 books in Scopus!

 

In case you missed the announcement, in mid-2013 Scopus launched the Books Expansion Project. Books from more than 30 major publishers such as Springer, Wiley-Blackwell, Elsevier, Brill, Walter de Gruyter, Princeton University Press, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Taylor & Francis, Palgrave Macmillan and Project Muse have been selected and are being processed for inclusion in Scopus. Although books from all subject fields are considered for the project, the focus is on Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities -- at least 25% of the books currently in Scopus are in these subject fields.

 

We asked Dr. Richard Whatmore, Arts & Humanities chairperson for Scopus’ Content Selection & Advisory Board, to tell us a bit about his favorite book in Scopus:

 

“My favourite book in Scopus is John (J. G.

Scopus to test new system in order to improve speed

on Fri, 09/12/2014 - 07:55

Starting September 15, Scopus will test a method of selective internet routing to speed up delivery of our pages to customers. Most customers will see an improvement in speed. However, some customers with unusual internet configurations may experience a problem. If you are suddenly unable to access Scopus as before, this may be due to incompatibility with the new routing method.

 

If you suddenly lose access to Scopus, please first check that the above is indeed the reason for the problem by trying the following URL: www2.scopus.com. This should give you direct access to the original Scopus IP address as before the test.  If you now have access again, then you will need to follow the steps below to restore normal service.

 

While we help you fix the problem, your users can continue to use Scopus via a workaround using www2.scopus.com. This may occasionally require them to change the URL – adding a 2 after www – for some links.

 

IP white listing is the problem

The problem is expected to

Release Date: 
September 15 2014

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