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Preprint content in Scopus Author Profiles continues to grow with the addition of SSRN

on Wed, 09/08/2021 - 23:48

In January this year, we used this blog to share the good news that preprints have been added to Scopus Author Profiles as a content type to help you get an early view into the research focus of peers and potential collaborators. Preprints can be a helpful complement to peer-reviewed literature to gain insight into researcher endeavors.

At that stage, we enriched 1 million author profiles with more than 900,000 preprints dating back to 2017. Those preprints were drawn from the main preprint servers in the areas of Physical Sciences (arXiv and ChemRxiv) and Biomedical Sciences (bioRxiv and medRxiv).

Now we are excited to announce that we’ve begun adding content from the Social Sciences preprint server SSRN to Scopus Author Profiles. By the end of this year, we expect to feature links to around 250,000 SSRN preprints dating back to 2017, which will bring the number of enriched Author Profiles to 1.4 million.

In addition, it is now possible to request changes to preprints associated

New Author Feedback Wizard (AFW) improvements: we’ve optimized the user journey and added preprints data

on Wed, 09/08/2021 - 23:18

We are pleased to announce a host of Author Feedback Wizard (AFW) enhancements, designed to save you time and improve the quality and accuracy of your Scopus Author Profiles.

So, what’s changed in the AFW?

  1. We’ve simplified the wizard and introduced modular options that support faster and easier updates.
  2. You can now use the AFW to provide feedback on any preprints linked to your profile.
  3. The AFW supports more granular and detailed feedback than ever before.  

The old AFW workflow

Prior to the new release, updating an author profile involved providing feedback on each one of the profile’s components - even those unaffected by your change request.

The new AFW workflow

Now, you can skip that step-by-step process and provide feedback on an individual component of an author profile, saving you time and effort.

Release Date: 
September 8 2021

What’s new on the Document details page? A Views Count metric, author previews, and enhanced Reaxys integration!

on Wed, 08/11/2021 - 14:54

Delivering you the ‘research signals’ you need to make data-driven decisions and track performance  is an important focus for the Scopus development team. Accordingly, we’ve delivered a series of enhancements to the Document details page, designed to help you achieve those goals.

So, what’s new on the Document details page?

  1. We have redesigned the metrics section and added a new metric - Views Count - so you can understand usage at a glance.
  2. We’ve added a ‘flyout’ (essentially, a boxed overlay that pops up on the page) containing key preview information from the associated Scopus Author Profile.
  3. For Reaxys customers, we have enhanced the way we showcase insights and information drawn from the expert-curated chemistry database.

The revamped metrics section, including the new metric, Views Count

We have added the option Metrics to the navigation menu for easy, one-click access to the new metrics section, which includes indicators previously available on the side panel.

Release Date: 
August 11 2021

New “Accepted Titles” list: get early insights into new Scopus content

on Tue, 07/27/2021 - 18:30

Our independent Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board approves new titles on an ongoing basis.  We take this rolling approach to journal selection so that the content collection in Scopus is continuously being expanded to respond to researcher needs.

However, to date, we haven’t publicized the newly accepted titles until they appear in the Scopus Source list. That approach is now changing: we understand that whether you are a researcher or a librarian, having access to the most up-to-date list of titles empowers you to make informed decisions around which journals to read, where to submit manuscripts, and more.

The new monthly “Accepted Titles” list can now be found on the Scopus Content webpage.  If you scroll to the bottom of the page, you will find the button highlighted in the image below.

Simply click to download the Excel file, and then select the second tab called “Accepted Titles”.  There you will find titles which

Release Date: 
July 27 2021

Re-evaluation: Maintaining high-quality content in Scopus

on Tue, 05/03/2016 - 02:29

Almost a year ago we announced the launch of the new Re-evaluation program for Scopus content. This program was created as an incentive for journals to maintain their high content quality. When a journal is originally suggested for Scopus, it must undergo a rigorous evaluation and selection process to ensure it meets all the high-quality title selection criteria required for acceptance into Scopus. However, journals must also demonstrate the ability to maintain their quality status year over year.

An additional focus for the first year of the re-evaluation program was to ensure all journals met the same baseline of quality standards. When Scopus launched in 2004, content originally came from different sources with different levels of evaluation.  Over time, evaluation criteria for new titles has evolved to become stricter and standardized.

Scopus undergoes testing to improve your search experience

on Thu, 04/14/2016 - 17:45

A few weeks ago, we posted on the importance of A/B testing and how it allows us to make better data-driven decisions about how to improve Scopus. In part two, we will focus on improvements to Scopus search that will start this coming week. This work will enable us to move forward with improvements to the search experience. For example, due to timing differences during processing, citation count values may appear to be different from (e.g. between search results and citation overview). This asynchronicity will be resolved once the changes are complete.

During this time, below are some of the things you may notice:

  • Search results: You might observe slight changes in the number of results returned. Or the ordering of results for the same search at different times (but not during a single session) could be different. Two different users at the same institution, or one person using multiple computers such as at home vs. at work, may see differences in search results.
  • Alerts and saved

6 simple search tips: Lessons learned from the Scopus Webinar

on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 22:20

Gillian Griffiths, Senior Scopus Product Manager and search specialist, recently held a webinar sharing "Scopus search tips to make your research more effective." In case you missed it, you can watch the recording here.

First, it’s important to know that the data in Scopus is highly structured; every piece of information is tagged, even down to the initials of the author in a reference inside an article’s list of references. This is what ensures that your search will be precise and return reliable results, and also differentiates Scopus from web search engines (watch minutes 00:09:30-00:12:43 to learn more).

As put by Gillian in the webinar, search is the process of "connecting the question in your head to the information inside the 61+ million items in Scopus."  So, what do you need to know in order to get the best results for your question? Here are 6 key things to keep in mind:

A/B testing: Making Scopus Better (Part I)

on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:45

How are changes to Scopus determined, and how does your use of Scopus impact the development process? This post is the first of a two-part series in which we discuss A/B testing and how data analysis is

helping us improve Scopus.

There are multiple ways the Scopus team works to identify potential product changes, with a focus to bring you the best experience and provide information faster and with deeper insights. From listening to user feedback to investigating new technology and trends, the product team continuously works to both iterate on existing features and functionality and develop new enhancements.

For an A&I database like Scopus, which serves researchers, institutions, and corporations from all over the world with timely information from over 5000 publishers, there is not a single “typical” user. Each individual user has a specific need and an ideal way they would like the product to work.

Scopus surpasses 120,000 indexed book titles!

on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 19:35

Scopus has now surpassed its targeted goal of 120,000 books indexed since the Scopus Book Titles Expansion program was first announced, marking the conclusion of the project (10,000 books will continue to be added annually). Reflecting back on the original goal, this is 45,000 more books than initially planned. Additionally, over 60% of the indexed books fall into the arts and humanities and/or social sciences categories, achieving a key objective to better support the book-based nature of these disciplines.

Search for a book in Scopus

To view a list of all books now indexed in Scopus, download the latest books title list.

You can sort the list by publisher, publication year, discipline and search by ISBN.

What defines a book in Scopus? Books are indexed on both a book and a chapter level.

Everything you need to know about Scopus content but didn’t know to ask

on Mon, 02/08/2016 - 22:23

In last month’s webinar the Scopus team brought you an overview of Scopus. This month, Dr. Wim Meester, Head of Scopus Product Management, joins us to bring a more in depth look at Scopus content and how it is relevant to you. From journals to books to conference papers, how is content selected for Scopus and how does it bring you a full view of what’s happening in your research world? Look to learn more about Scopus content curation and the high quality standards each title must meet and retain in order to be included.

If you have questions about what is and is not included in Scopus, how far back content goes, what the coverage is for your area of interest, or how Scopus content coverage impacts author and article-level metrics, this webinar is for you.                                         

Dr. Meester will also share practical tips and tricks to help you get more from Scopus content.

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