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Re-evaluation: Maintaining high-quality content in Scopus

on Tue, 05/03/2016 - 02:29

Almost a year ago we announced the launch of the new Re-evaluation program for Scopus content. This program was created as an incentive for journals to maintain their high content quality. When a journal is originally suggested for Scopus, it must undergo a rigorous evaluation and selection process to ensure it meets all the high-quality title selection criteria required for acceptance into Scopus. However, journals must also demonstrate the ability to maintain their quality status year over year.

An additional focus for the first year of the re-evaluation program was to ensure all journals met the same baseline of quality standards. When Scopus launched in 2004, content originally came from different sources with different levels of evaluation.  Over time, evaluation criteria for new titles has evolved to become stricter and standardized.

Scopus undergoes testing to improve your search experience

on Thu, 04/14/2016 - 17:45

A few weeks ago, we posted on the importance of A/B testing and how it allows us to make better data-driven decisions about how to improve Scopus. In part two, we will focus on improvements to Scopus search that will start this coming week. This work will enable us to move forward with improvements to the search experience. For example, due to timing differences during processing, citation count values may appear to be different from (e.g. between search results and citation overview). This asynchronicity will be resolved once the changes are complete.

During this time, below are some of the things you may notice:

  • Search results: You might observe slight changes in the number of results returned. Or the ordering of results for the same search at different times (but not during a single session) could be different. Two different users at the same institution, or one person using multiple computers such as at home vs. at work, may see differences in search results.
  • Alerts and saved

6 simple search tips: Lessons learned from the Scopus Webinar

on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 22:20

Gillian Griffiths, Senior Scopus Product Manager and search specialist, recently held a webinar sharing "Scopus search tips to make your research more effective." In case you missed it, you can watch the recording here.

First, it’s important to know that the data in Scopus is highly structured; every piece of information is tagged, even down to the initials of the author in a reference inside an article’s list of references. This is what ensures that your search will be precise and return reliable results, and also differentiates Scopus from web search engines (watch minutes 00:09:30-00:12:43 to learn more).

As put by Gillian in the webinar, search is the process of "connecting the question in your head to the information inside the 61+ million items in Scopus."  So, what do you need to know in order to get the best results for your question? Here are 6 key things to keep in mind:

A/B testing: Making Scopus Better (Part I)

on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:45

How are changes to Scopus determined, and how does your use of Scopus impact the development process? This post is the first of a two-part series in which we discuss A/B testing and how data analysis is

helping us improve Scopus.

There are multiple ways the Scopus team works to identify potential product changes, with a focus to bring you the best experience and provide information faster and with deeper insights. From listening to user feedback to investigating new technology and trends, the product team continuously works to both iterate on existing features and functionality and develop new enhancements.

For an A&I database like Scopus, which serves researchers, institutions, and corporations from all over the world with timely information from over 5000 publishers, there is not a single “typical” user. Each individual user has a specific need and an ideal way they would like the product to work.

Scopus surpasses 120,000 indexed book titles!

on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 19:35

Scopus has now surpassed its targeted goal of 120,000 books indexed since the Scopus Book Titles Expansion program was first announced, marking the conclusion of the project (10,000 books will continue to be added annually). Reflecting back on the original goal, this is 45,000 more books than initially planned. Additionally, over 60% of the indexed books fall into the arts and humanities and/or social sciences categories, achieving a key objective to better support the book-based nature of these disciplines.

Search for a book in Scopus

To view a list of all books now indexed in Scopus, download the latest books title list.

You can sort the list by publisher, publication year, discipline and search by ISBN.

What defines a book in Scopus? Books are indexed on both a book and a chapter level.

Everything you need to know about Scopus content but didn’t know to ask

on Mon, 02/08/2016 - 22:23

In last month’s webinar the Scopus team brought you an overview of Scopus. This month, Dr. Wim Meester, Head of Scopus Product Management, joins us to bring a more in depth look at Scopus content and how it is relevant to you. From journals to books to conference papers, how is content selected for Scopus and how does it bring you a full view of what’s happening in your research world? Look to learn more about Scopus content curation and the high quality standards each title must meet and retain in order to be included.

If you have questions about what is and is not included in Scopus, how far back content goes, what the coverage is for your area of interest, or how Scopus content coverage impacts author and article-level metrics, this webinar is for you.                                         

Dr. Meester will also share practical tips and tricks to help you get more from Scopus content.

More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

More content, more features, more to learn. Monthly webinars help you get more from Scopus

on Thu, 01/07/2016 - 18:43

Join expert-led webinars monthly and improve your Scopus experience

The start of a new year is often a time of making resolutions, beginning new endeavors, re-evaluating and setting new goals. It’s a time to reflect on the past year and move forward — ideally toward a better and brighter path. One of the new paths the Scopus team is taking this year is to introduce an ongoing webinar program. Nearly every month, one of the Scopus team members will host a topical webinar to bring you more insight into the product, not only to improve your experience with it but also to answer questions about its content, capabilities and vision.

So, no matter what your New Year’s resolutions are — to work more efficiently, to find the most relevant content, to track or measure research impact, or even if you don’t make resolutions — join us regularly to learn something new about Scopus and build your knowledge and understanding about what it can

Breaking the 1996 barrier: Scopus adds nearly 4 million pre-1996 articles and more than 83 million references

on Mon, 07/20/2015 - 13:53

Scopus data has been growing exponentially over the last year — and perhaps not in the way you might expect. In the last 7 months, Scopus has added over 83 million pre-1996 cited references to nearly 4 million articles.

Currently, the average number of references per pre-1996 article is 22.9.

This has been achieved in two ways; by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles, and by adding article back files, including their cited references, from the archives of 36 major publishers, going back to 1970. Keep in mind that this is only the beginning. By the end of 2016 we anticipate that these numbers will grow to approximately 12 million* complete records for pre-1996 articles, contributing more than 150 million cited references. This is on top of the 1 billion plus references already included in Scopus today.

* Note: We expect to reach 10 million records by the end of this year.

What does this mean for

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