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Use Scopus to determine which sources an author cites most

on Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:49

Recently a librarian posted to @Scopus on Twitter about gathering statistics on an author’s citation trends. Here’s a way you can use tools on the Scopus author profile page to determine which sources an author cites most frequently.

  1. Perform an <Author Search> and search for the author of interest
  2. Find the correct author from the results list and click on the author’s name
  3. From the author’s detail page, find the ‘Author History’ box on the right and click on the number next to <References>
  4. This opens the search results window and lists the references the author has cited across his or her publications
  5. Click on <Analyze search results> and open the <Source> tab
  6. Here you’ll not only see a list of the top sources the author references (and number of documents from each source), but you can also use the graph to view even more details, or create a chart in which you can compare journal metric values.
  7. You can also export, print and email the information from the charts

To see this done, watch

4 ways to view and use the 2014 Scopus journal metrics

on Wed, 07/15/2015 - 17:30

Whether you are an author investigating where to submit your paper, an editor evaluating your journal’s performance or a librarian reviewing the impact of your investments, it is important to know how journals compare to each other. With the 2014 journal metric values for the Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) and Impact per Publication (IPP) live in Scopus, now is a good time for evaluation and comparison.

All journals included in Scopus receive journal metric values — and the extensive, global coverage of Scopus means you can evaluate any journal’s role in the scholarly publication landscape, regardless of whether or not they are included in Impact Factor assessments.  Additionally, over 22,000 serials across science, social sciences and the arts and humanities also receive citation performance metrics in Scopus.

Here are 4 ways you can view and use the 2014 journal metric values:

  1. From the Scopus home page, go to ‘Browse sources’ and search for an

Analyze thousands of search results in less than a minute

on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 17:43

The next time you search in Scopus, gain more insight into your results by using the <Analyze search results> feature located at the top of your search results page. It provides a visual analysis of your results broken up into 7 categories (year, source, author, affiliation, country/territory, document type and subject area).

EXAMPLE: You want to find out which organizations are producing the most content about “wearable technology.”

  1. Begin with a search on "wearable technology"
  2. Your results return a list of over 5,900 publications. To sort through the results quickly, and to find your answer, try clicking on the  <Analyze search results> link to find your answer — all in about 30 seconds!

  1. You will find that your results are now organized in to 7 different catagories
  2. To find the answer for this example, click on the <Affiliation> tab

  1. The chart on the

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, an older post about the h-index continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus in the past few years, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index includes citations back to 1970, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the Scopus Feedback Wizard

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