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More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

More content, more features, more to learn. Monthly webinars help you get more from Scopus

on Thu, 01/07/2016 - 18:43

Join expert-led webinars monthly and improve your Scopus experience

The start of a new year is often a time of making resolutions, beginning new endeavors, re-evaluating and setting new goals. It’s a time to reflect on the past year and move forward — ideally toward a better and brighter path. One of the new paths the Scopus team is taking this year is to introduce an ongoing webinar program. Nearly every month, one of the Scopus team members will host a topical webinar to bring you more insight into the product, not only to improve your experience with it but also to answer questions about its content, capabilities and vision.

So, no matter what your New Year’s resolutions are — to work more efficiently, to find the most relevant content, to track or measure research impact, or even if you don’t make resolutions — join us regularly to learn something new about Scopus and build your knowledge and understanding about what it

Breaking the 1996 barrier: Scopus adds nearly 4 million pre-1996 articles and more than 83 million references

on Mon, 07/20/2015 - 13:53

Scopus data has been growing exponentially over the last year — and perhaps not in the way you might expect. In the last 7 months, Scopus has added over 83 million pre-1996 cited references to nearly 4 million articles.

Currently, the average number of references per pre-1996 article is 22.9.

This has been achieved in two ways; by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles, and by adding article back files, including their cited references, from the archives of 36 major publishers, going back to 1970. Keep in mind that this is only the beginning. By the end of 2016 we anticipate that these numbers will grow to approximately 12 million* complete records for pre-1996 articles, contributing more than 150 million cited references. This is on top of the 1 billion plus references already included in Scopus today.

* Note: We expect to reach 10 million records by the end of this year.

What does this mean

Use Scopus to determine which sources an author cites most

on Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:49

Recently a librarian posted to @Scopus on Twitter about gathering statistics on an author’s citation trends. Here’s a way you can use tools on the Scopus author profile page to determine which sources an author cites most frequently.

  1. Perform an <Author Search> and search for the author of interest
  2. Find the correct author from the results list and click on the author’s name
  3. From the author’s detail page, find the ‘Author History’ box on the right and click on the number next to <References>
  4. This opens the search results window and lists the references the author has cited across his or her publications
  5. Click on <Analyze search results> and open the <Source> tab
  6. Here you’ll not only see a list of the top sources the author references (and number of documents from each source), but you can also use the graph to view even more details, or create a chart in which you can compare journal metric values.
  7. You can also export, print and email the information from the charts

To see this done, watch

4 ways to view and use the 2014 Scopus journal metrics

on Wed, 07/15/2015 - 17:30

Whether you are an author investigating where to submit your paper, an editor evaluating your journal’s performance or a librarian reviewing the impact of your investments, it is important to know how journals compare to each other. With the 2014 journal metric values for the Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) and Impact per Publication (IPP) live in Scopus, now is a good time for evaluation and comparison.

All journals included in Scopus receive journal metric values — and the extensive, global coverage of Scopus means you can evaluate any journal’s role in the scholarly publication landscape, regardless of whether or not they are included in Impact Factor assessments.  Additionally, over 22,000 serials across science, social sciences and the arts and humanities also receive citation performance metrics in Scopus.

Here are 4 ways you can view and use the 2014 journal metric values:

  1. From the Scopus home page, go to ‘Browse sources’ and search for an

Analyze thousands of search results in less than a minute

on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 17:43

The next time you search in Scopus, gain more insight into your results by using the <Analyze search results> feature located at the top of your search results page. It provides a visual analysis of your results broken up into 7 categories (year, source, author, affiliation, country/territory, document type and subject area).

EXAMPLE: You want to find out which organizations are producing the most content about “wearable technology.”

  1. Begin with a search on "wearable technology"
  2. Your results return a list of over 5,900 publications. To sort through the results quickly, and to find your answer, try clicking on the  <Analyze search results> link to find your answer — all in about 30 seconds!

  1. You will find that your results are now organized in to 7 different catagories
  2. To find the answer for this example, click on the <Affiliation> tab

  1. The chart on

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, an older post about the h-index continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus in the past few years, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index includes citations back to 1970, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the Scopus Feedback Wizard

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