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Celebrating the ultimate pi moment

on Fri, 03/13/2015 - 09:49

Pi Day is observed annually on March 14, commemorating the famous mathematical constant π (pi) that represents the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.

On the occasion of Pi Day we dug through our Scopus math content: from a total of 2.3M+ results for subject area ''mathematics'', 71.4% of the content comes from journal articles, while 22.7% is derived from conference papers (compared to 82.3% and 15.1% respectively from one year ago).

You can view the complete breakdown below:

Read more about Elsevier mathematics journals and learn about free access to archived articles.

Did you know?

  • Albert Einstein's birthday also falls on March 14.

  • Pi Day 2015 is quite special, since there will be an instant when the first 10 digits of Pi are reflected on the (US) date/time format (3/14/15, 9:26:53).

Scopus celebrates Pi Day

on Fri, 03/14/2014 - 00:33

Happy Pi day! 3.14159 (or the number otherwise known as Pi or π) is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. This irrational number has long intrigued mathematicians and has even found a place in pop culture with its own holiday. Even our friends at ElsevierConnect have written about it today.

Pi appears throughout history. From Antiquity (there’s debate about if the Giza Pyramid builders had knowledge of Pi), to ancient Greek, Chinese, Indian and Persian mathematicians (including Archimedes, Liu Hui, Aryabhata and Jamshīd al-Kāshī), to 17th and 18th century European mathematicians and into the modern computer age.

So let’s talk about Scopus’ math content. An Advanced search for SUBJAREA(MATH) yields more than 2.1M results. 2.114221 to be precise (search executed 3/14/2014). Refining the initial search using the limiter “pi” narrows the results to 40,402 documents.

By clicking on “Analyze results” you can see more detail about these 40,402 records including popular