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Metrics

PlumX Metrics soon to be integrated on Scopus: How will it help you tell the story of your research?

on Tue, 06/27/2017 - 19:01

Since it was first announced in February 2017 that Plum Analytics was joining Elsevier, the Plum Analytics and Scopus teams have been working together to integrate PlumX Metrics as the primary source of article-level metrics on Scopus (along with other Elsevier platforms and products), replacing metrics previously provided by Altmetrics.com. With the integration now just around the corner, here is an overview of what PlumX Metrics are to prepare you for the type of insights you will soon be able to find on Scopus.

PlumX Metrics is Plum Analytics’ comprehensive, item-level metrics that provide insights into the ways people interact with individual pieces of research output (articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and many more) in the online environment. To support like-with-like analysis and help make sense of the huge amounts of data involved (check out the metrics sources here), they are divided into five categories:

CiteScore Revealed: More Transparency, More Clarity

on Wed, 04/26/2017 - 21:51

For metrics to be understood and trusted, clarity into how they work and are calculated is important. When CiteScore was first introduced, we shared the methodology behind the calculation. Now we are taking transparency a step further by enabling anyone to validate any CiteScore value by clicking into the numerator (citations) and denominator (documents) for free.

What this means for you.

When viewing the Source details page for a title on Scopus, you can see the data behind the CiteScore calculation by clicking on either the citation or document count. This opens a window where you can toggle between the list of documents and citations. In addition, if you’re institution subscribes to Scopus and you are logged in, you can even export the information into a CSV file.

Try it now. Go to JournalMetrics.Scopus.com to get started.

Follow an Example:

Let’s look at the title Mathematical Programming Computation, published by

CiteScore Tracker: Keep current with how a title’s CiteScore is building each month

on Tue, 04/18/2017 - 02:46

While a metric like CiteScore provides a consistent way to track performance annually, CiteScore Tracker also shows how the current year’s CiteScore builds up each month — additional information that may be helpful when making decisions.

How it works: CiteScore Tracker is calculated in the same way as CiteScore, but for the current year, rather than previous, complete years. The numerator (citation count) of the current year’s metric builds up every month as additional citations are received, so that the construction is consistent with the construction of the complete year CiteScore. Once the new annual CiteScore value is fixed, then the CiteScore Tracker for the next year begins and is displayed on Scopus.com. For examples, once CiteScore 2016 is fixed the CiteScore Tracker 2017 will also be initiated and available on Scopus.

Where to find it:

  1. Go to the Journal Metrics page: https://journalmetrics.scopus.com/

  1. Find the

How to explore, compare and track journal citation impact with CiteScore metrics

on Wed, 02/08/2017 - 16:52

In January, we held a webinar on CiteScore metrics – not only providing an overview of what CiteScore metrics are, but also showing you how to access and use the new metrics. In case you missed it, the recorded webinar is available for you to view here. Take some time to learn about why CiteScore was created, how it is calculated and what it brings to the overall basket of metrics.      

Additionally, follow these tips to get started exploring CiteScore metrics.

Tip 1: Decide where to begin

There are two main places to access CiteScore metrics, both are freely available to anyone. They are:

  1. The Sources page on Scopus.com itself: https://www.scopus.com/sources, and
  2. Journalmetrics.scopus.com

But, which one you begin with depends upon what you want to do.

  • If you want to delve into the details and interrogate metrics for a singular title, start on Scopus itself: https://www.scopus.com/sources. Here you can search for a

A new standard of journal citation impact: Powered by Scopus

on Wed, 12/07/2016 - 21:22

As the age of electronic publishing has matured, researchers, publishers, bibliometricians, librarians, institutional leaders and others in academia have been exploring ways to bring research metrics into the 21st century. Journal metrics continue to be important in the research community, alongside metrics for measuring other entities such as articles, researchers, institutions, subject areas, and so forth.

Today, Scopus is expanding its basket of metrics by adding CiteScore™ metrics — a family of eight indicators that offer complementary views to analyze the impact of all serial titles — including journals — on Scopus.

Easy and free to access, the family of CiteScore metrics include:

  • CiteScore
  • CiteScore Tracker
  • CiteScore Percentile
  • CiteScore Quartiles
  • CiteScore Rank
  • Citation Count
  • Document Count
  • Percentage Cited

A new standard and how it works:

CiteScore is essentially the average

Release Date: 
December 8 2016

Journal Metrics in Scopus: Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

on Tue, 09/13/2016 - 01:54

In a previous post we began looking at some of the metrics featured in Library Connect’s Quick Reference Cards for Research Impact Metrics and sharing how they relate to Scopus. The first post covered SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). Continuing on with the journal metrics theme, in this post we discuss Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP).

SNIP was created by Professor Henk Moed at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CTWS), University of Leiden. It measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field, using Scopus data.

Or, as stated by the CTWS, “SNIP corrects for differences in citation practices between scientific fields, thereby allowing for more accurate between-field comparisons of citation impact.” (http://www.journalindicators.com/)

As shared in the quick reference card displayed, SNIP is derived

Journal Metrics in Scopus: SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

on Tue, 08/02/2016 - 19:18

Recently, Library Connect worked with librarian Jenny Delasalle to create a set of quick reference cards on research impact metrics. Both a poster (11x17) sized version, which includes all the metrics on one page, and a larger format featuring 4 metrics cards per page, are available for download.  Each card provides a quick summary of the metric — including how it’s calculated, what it measures and whether it appli

es to journals, authors or documents — and serves as a good jumping off point for further discussions around metrics. To add a bit more context regarding their specific relationship to Scopus, we will be looking at individual cards and providing the Scopus connection, starting with SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

As stated in the card, SJR weights citations based on the source they come from.The subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation.

ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC) launches Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016 using Scopus data and SciVal metrics

on Fri, 06/17/2016 - 20:15

We are pleased to announce that the ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC) is using Scopus data and metrics from SciVal analytics for its Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016. The recently released ranking ranks global universities in 7 engineering subjects, including Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Energy Science & Engineering, Environmental Science & Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

This new subject ranking continues the SRC’s use of transparent methodology and third-party data. Ranking indicators include those measures of research productivity, research with high quality, research with top quality, average global research impact, extent of international collaboration, extent of academic-corporation collaboration, researchers with global academic influences, and academic awards.

The Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016 is the second ranking by SRC to use Scopus data and SciVal metrics.The

Celebrating Earth Day: SciVal and Scopus investigate

on Fri, 04/22/2016 - 15:56

Today, April 22nd is Earth Day and we celebrate this day with a joint SciVal and Scopus infographic. Now in its 46th year, Earth Day aims to promote a healthy, sustainable environment, address climate change and protect the Earth for future generations.

In 2015, Elsevier’s Analytical Services team in collaboration with SciDev.Net wrote a report about the global research landscape that surrounds the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The Sustainability in Science report focused on 6 key themes, one of which was the “Planet”. In celebration of Earth Day, we used the same search terms for the “Planet” theme in both SciVal and Scopus to take a look at the researchers, institutions and countries working in sustainability science.

Check out the infographic available now on our info site.

How to discover key influencers and uncover trends from your Scopus search results

on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 07:28

Scopus indexes over 120,000 book titles; and, by using the <Analyze search results> tool in Scopus in tandem with searching book content, you can gain a powerful way of discovering key influencers and uncovering important trends. To demonstrate how this works, watch our video or follow the steps below:

 

 

For this example, let’s say you are looking to find broad-based content and subject area experts on economic behavior. Note: click on each image to enlarge

  1. Begin a search in Scopus for Economic Behavior

  1. The search returns over 69,000 document results. To make this a less intimidating number and isolate only book content, filter your results to <Books> on the left hand side, under the <Document type> parameter; and click on <Limit to>

  1. Next, sort by <Cited by> to quickly identify the most impactful books
  2. Begin scrolling through the list and click on <Show abstract> to read more about a book and

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