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Metrics

How to explore, compare and track journal citation impact with CiteScore metrics

on Wed, 02/08/2017 - 16:52

In January, we held a webinar on CiteScore metrics – not only providing an overview of what CiteScore metrics are, but also showing you how to access and use the new metrics. In case you missed it, the recorded webinar is available for you to view here. Take some time to learn about why CiteScore was created, how it is calculated and what it brings to the overall basket of metrics.      

Additionally, follow these tips to get started exploring CiteScore metrics.

Tip 1: Decide where to begin

There are two main places to access CiteScore metrics, both are freely available to anyone. They are:

  1. The Sources page on Scopus.com itself: https://www.scopus.com/sources, and
  2. Journalmetrics.scopus.com

But, which one you begin with depends upon what you want to do.

  • If you want to delve into the details and interrogate metrics for a singular title, start on Scopus itself: https://www.scopus.com/sources. Here you can search for a particular title and then access the metrics and underlying data.

A new standard of journal citation impact: Powered by Scopus

on Wed, 12/07/2016 - 21:22

As the age of electronic publishing has matured, researchers, publishers, bibliometricians, librarians, institutional leaders and others in academia have been exploring ways to bring research metrics into the 21st century. Journal metrics continue to be important in the research community, alongside metrics for measuring other entities such as articles, researchers, institutions, subject areas, and so forth.

Today, Scopus is expanding its basket of metrics by adding CiteScore™ metrics — a family of eight indicators that offer complementary views to analyze the impact of all serial titles — including journals — on Scopus.

Easy and free to access, the family of CiteScore metrics include:

  • CiteScore
  • CiteScore Tracker
  • CiteScore Percentile
  • CiteScore Quartiles
  • CiteScore Rank
  • Citation Count
  • Document Count
  • Percentage Cited

A new standard and how it works:

CiteScore is essentially the average citations per document that a title receives over a three-year period.

Release Date: 
December 8 2016

Journal Metrics in Scopus: Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

on Tue, 09/13/2016 - 01:54

Last month, we began a series of posts looking at some of the metrics featured in Library Connect’s Quick Reference Cards for Research Impact Metrics and sharing how they relate to Scopus. The first post covered SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). Continuing on with the journal metrics theme, today we take a look at Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP).

SNIP was created by Professor Henk Moed at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CTWS), University of Leiden. It measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field, using Scopus data.

Or, as stated by the CTWS, “SNIP corrects for differences in citation practices between scientific fields, thereby allowing for more accurate between-field comparisons of citation impact.” (http://www.journalindicators.com/)

As shared in the quick reference card displayed, SNIP is derived by taking a journal’s citation count per paper and dividing it by the citation potential in

Journal Metrics in Scopus: SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

on Tue, 08/02/2016 - 19:18

Recently, Library Connect worked with librarian Jenny Delasalle to create a set of quick reference cards on research impact metrics. Both a poster (11x17) sized version, which includes all the metrics on one page, and a larger format featuring 4 metrics cards per page, are available for download.  Each card provides a quick summary of the metric — including how it’s calculated, what it measures and whether it applies to journals, authors or documents — and serves as a good jumping off point for further discussions around metrics. To add a bit more context regarding their specific relationship to Scopus, we will be looking at individual cards and providing the Scopus connection, starting with SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

As stated in the card, SJR weights citations based on the source they come from.The subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation. SJR also normalizes for differences in citation behavior between subject fields.

ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC) launches Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016 using Scopus data and SciVal metrics

on Fri, 06/17/2016 - 20:15

We are pleased to announce that the ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC) is using Scopus data and metrics from SciVal analytics for its Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016. The recently released ranking ranks global universities in 7 engineering subjects, including Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Energy Science & Engineering, Environmental Science & Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

This new subject ranking continues the SRC’s use of transparent methodology and third-party data. Ranking indicators include those measures of research productivity, research with high quality, research with top quality, average global research impact, extent of international collaboration, extent of academic-corporation collaboration, researchers with global academic influences, and academic awards.

The Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016 is the second ranking by SRC to use Scopus data and SciVal metrics.The

Celebrating Earth Day: SciVal and Scopus investigate

on Fri, 04/22/2016 - 15:56

Today, April 22nd is Earth Day and we celebrate this day with a joint SciVal and Scopus infographic. Now in its 46th year, Earth Day aims to promote a healthy, sustainable environment, address climate change and protect the Earth for future generations.

In 2015, Elsevier’s Analytical Services team in collaboration with SciDev.Net wrote a report about the global research landscape that surrounds the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The Sustainability in Science report focused on 6 key themes, one of which was the “Planet”. In celebration of Earth Day, we used the same search terms for the “Planet” theme in both SciVal and Scopus to take a look at the researchers, institutions and countries working in sustainability science.

Check out the infographic available now on our info site.

How to discover key influencers and uncover trends from your Scopus search results

on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 07:28

Scopus indexes over 120,000 book titles; and, by using the <Analyze search results> tool in Scopus in tandem with searching book content, you can gain a powerful way of discovering key influencers and uncovering important trends. To demonstrate how this works, watch our video or follow the steps below:

 

 

For this example, let’s say you are looking to find broad-based content and subject area experts on economic behavior. Note: click on each image to enlarge

  1. Begin a search in Scopus for Economic Behavior

  1. The search returns over 69,000 document results. To make this a less intimidating number and isolate only book content, filter your results to <Books> on the left hand side, under the <Document type> parameter; and click on <Limit to>

  1. Next, sort by <Cited by> to quickly identify the most impactful books
  2. Begin scrolling through the list and click on <Show abstract> to read more about a book and decide whether it is relevant to your research needs

  1. Once you isolate a book that both relevant to

Webinar: SciVal economic indicators with guest speakers from Queensland University & Penn State

on Tue, 03/08/2016 - 18:48

"Patent citation metrics extends SciVal beyond scholarly output — they create a link between research and economic or commercial potential"  -- Michelle Hutnik, Penn State University

 

With the February 25th release, SciVal introduced new data types to help assess the economic impact of your research and provide a broader basket of metrics for more informed decision making. The new data types include:

  • Patent-article citations which provide a proxy for innovation and the potential to transfer that knowledge to industry
  • Scopus view counts now available in all modules to give you an immediate indication regarding the popularity of your research

Join the SciVal team, along with guest speakers from the University of Queensland and Penn State University, for an interactive webinar.

Based on Scopus data, SRC launches '2016 Best Chinese University Ranking' report

on Mon, 02/22/2016 - 12:38

We are pleased to announce that the recently-released "2016 Best Chinese University Ranking" report, based on evaluation by the ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC), is again using Scopus data and metrics from SciVal.

The report provides a detailed look at key research performance indicators for more than 1,000 higher education institutions across mainland China. The ranking offers research management offices and higher education agencies an objective benchmarking of the research performance of higher education institutions. It also provides them with another set of metrics with which to strategically assess policy development and investments towards building the research capabilities of these universities.

In addition to ShanghaiRanking Consultancy, Elsevier also provides Scopus data and SciVal analytics to Times Higher Education's World University Ranking, QS' Top Universities Ranking, US News & World Report's Arab Region Ranking, Financial Times' MBA Ranking and Maclean’s Canadian

Celebrating Valentine’s Day: SciVal and Scopus investigate Cupid’s Chemicals

on Sat, 02/13/2016 - 19:22

Valentine’s Day has evolved into a celebration of one of the strongest of human emotions, romantic love. The visible signs of love can be obvious to spot, from a racing pulse to flushed cheeks, but it appears that Cupid is not working alone.

According to one of the best-known researchers on the topic, Dr. Helen Fisher, Senior Research Fellow, at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, and a Member of the Center For Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University, when it comes to love, we are at the mercy of our biochemistry. Fisher concludes that each of the three stages of falling in love are aided by different set of hormones.

Using Scopus and SciVal, we have investigated the chemicals related to each stage of love to see the people, papers and journals behind the ‘Science of Love.’ #CupidsChemicals

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