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Document Download Manager - certificate notification

on Tue, 02/16/2016 - 19:43

Users trying to use the Document Download Manager in Scopus have encountered a certification notification error. We are aware of this problem and a new certificate is being created to resolve this issue. In the meantime, if you are able to modify the Java settings you can follow the below steps to temporarily bypass the notification issue.
 

  1. In Windows click Start and go to control panel.
  2. Click on Programs.
  3. Click on the Java icon.
  4. Click the Security tab 
  5. Click ‘edit Site list’ and add http://scddm.quosavl.com/ddm/scopus.jsp to the ‘exception site  list’.

We will keep you updated on the progress of the certificate update.

Celebrating Valentine’s Day: SciVal and Scopus investigate Cupid’s Chemicals

on Sat, 02/13/2016 - 19:22

Valentine’s Day has evolved into a celebration of one of the strongest of human emotions, romantic love. The visible signs of love can be obvious to spot, from a racing pulse to flushed cheeks, but it appears that Cupid is not working alone.

According to one of the best-known researchers on the topic, Dr. Helen Fisher, Senior Research Fellow, at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, and a Member of the Center For Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University, when it comes to love, we are at the mercy of our biochemistry. Fisher concludes that each of the three stages of falling in love are aided by different set of hormones.

Using Scopus and SciVal, we have investigated the chemicals related to each stage of love to see the people, papers and journals behind the ‘Science of Love.’ #CupidsChemicals

Everything you need to know about Scopus content but didn’t know to ask

on Mon, 02/08/2016 - 22:23

In last month’s webinar the Scopus team brought you an overview of Scopus. This month, Dr. Wim Meester, Head of Scopus Product Management, joins us to bring a more in depth look at Scopus content and how it is relevant to you. From journals to books to conference papers, how is content selected for Scopus and how does it bring you a full view of what’s happening in your research world? Look to learn more about Scopus content curation and the high quality standards each title must meet and retain in order to be included.

If you have questions about what is and is not included in Scopus, how far back content goes, what the coverage is for your area of interest, or how Scopus content coverage impacts author and article-level metrics, this webinar is for you.                                         

Dr. Meester will also share practical tips and tricks to help you get more from Scopus content.

More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

Scopus experiencing issues with Alerts

on Mon, 01/04/2016 - 22:25

Scopus has been experiencing issues with its Alerts system since December 28, 2015. This means that no Alerts have been sent since the 28th. The root cause of the issue has been identified and the Alerts are currently being re-processed. We expect all systems to be working properly within the next 24 hours. We apologize for any inconvenience this might have caused and we will update this post (and social media) when the issues are resolved.

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 3: A rise in the number of data partnerships

on Wed, 12/16/2015 - 21:17

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over 3 posts, we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post covers a different focus.

Part one focused on Scopus content growth and quality and part 2 looked at product developments changing the way you can find, use and evaluate content. This third post focuses on the continuing trend in growth of data partnerships throughout 2015. While data partnerships may not directly impact everyday use of Scopus, the trend is a noteworthy 2015 highlight. Here is why:

Scopus data underpins important ranking reports. Not unrelated to the progress Scopus has made in content expansion (while still maintaining quality) and in measuring research impact, this year also saw a growing trend in the number of ranking organizations turning to Scopus as their data provider. Why? As explained by Times Higher Education (THE) Managing Director, Trevor

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 2: New tools to help find, use and evaluate content

on Tue, 12/15/2015 - 21:10

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over 3 posts, we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post will cover a different focus.

Part one focused on Scopus content growth and quality. Today, we look at 2015 product developments. In terms of new features introduced this year, two prominent changes stand out — one designed to provide deeper insights into an article’s research impact, and the other to help you identify open access titles.

  • Understanding research impact. In July, Scopus moved away from the altmetric.com and introduced its own metrics module. Why? As shared by Elsevier’s Mike Taylor (Senior Product Manager, Informetrics) in a recent webinar, although the ‘altmetric.com donut’ was engaging, it didn’t quite give you an indication of how an article was performing compared to others.

Scheduled maintenance for Scopus, ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Mendeley on Sunday, December 20, 2015

on Tue, 12/15/2015 - 13:26

Due to scheduled maintenance Scopus, ScienceDirect, Engineering Village and Mendeley will experience a brief service outage on Sunday December 20 between 12:00 a.m. EST( 5:00 a.m. GMT) and 12:00 p.m. EST(5:00 p.m. GMT).
This brief outage is not expected to last more than 10 minutes.

Please use The World Clock Time Zone Converter to convert the announced planned outage time to your local time.

Release Date: 
December 15 2015

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 1: More content, but not at the expense of quality

on Mon, 12/14/2015 - 20:26

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over the next 3 days we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post will cover a different focus. This post, part 1, covers content expansion and quality. The next post, part 2, discusses features and functionality. And the final post, part 3, will look at data partnerships.  

In terms of content, Scopus has been growing exponentially (reaching over 60 million by the end of December), but this is not at the expense of quality. Here are 3 things to know about what’s changed for Scopus content in 2015:

1.) CSAB implements additional content quality measures. High content quality has always been important to Scopus and why the independent Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) was established in 2005. The board already maintains and follows a robust selection policy for any

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