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Five steps to creating a citation overview in Scopus

on Mon, 05/23/2016 - 17:16

In a recent Scopus Webinar, Scopus Product Manager, Kai Wan, joined us to share some best practices on how to use Scopus analysis tools in your research. In this tip & trick, we focus on the Citation Overview tool, which Kai covers in minutes 00:11:03–00:15:18 of his presentation. If you missed the live webinar, you can watch it anytime here.

The Scopus Citation Overview tool offers an interactive way to:

  • View the citation trend for a set of documents
  • Find all publications citing a specific document (or set of documents), and
  • Discover the overall impact of publications in a research area.

Before creating a Citation Overview, here are 2 key points to remember:

  • To use the interactive table within Scopus, select no more than 2,000 items at a time.
  • If you want to analyze a results list >2,000 (and up to 20,000),you will be prompted to request a direct export and receive the information as a .csv file

Tip: It is best to first

Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references - and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 - 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.


Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American

Release Date: 
November 26 2015

Seamlessly integrate Scopus citation counts into your webpage

on Tue, 09/22/2015 - 16:19

Scopus APIs are a great way to showcase your research, your institution’s work and connect others with Scopus content and data. Additionally, anyone can obtain an API key and use our APIs free of charge, provided that our policies for using APIs and the data are honored.  You can learn about the variety of APIs available for Scopus on our new Scopus API page here.  We also thought it would be helpful to highlight the value each Scopus API provides, one post at a time, starting with this one on the Scopus Cited-by Counts API.

To provide an example of how Scopus APIs can add value, Victoria Rao, the Elsevier Product Manager responsible for both Scopus and ScienceDirect APIs, presents a personal example — using the Scopus Cited-by Counts API to add a dynamic display of her husband’s research accomplishments into his online publication list and CV.

So, rather than a simple list of his authored work, as seen here (figure 1),

Figure 1

Use Scopus to determine which sources an author cites most

on Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:49

Recently a librarian posted to @Scopus on Twitter about gathering statistics on an author’s citation trends. Here’s a way you can use tools on the Scopus author profile page to determine which sources an author cites most frequently.

  1. Perform an <Author Search> and search for the author of interest
  2. Find the correct author from the results list and click on the author’s name
  3. From the author’s detail page, find the ‘Author History’ box on the right and click on the number next to <References>
  4. This opens the search results window and lists the references the author has cited across his or her publications
  5. Click on <Analyze search results> and open the <Source> tab
  6. Here you’ll not only see a list of the top sources the author references (and number of documents from each source), but you can also use the graph to view even more details, or create a chart in which you can compare journal metric values.
  7. You can also export, print and email the information from the charts

To see this done, watch

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, an older post about the h-index continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus in the past few years, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index includes citations back to 1970, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the Scopus Feedback Wizard

Scopus Conference Expansion Program exceeds targets

on Thu, 02/19/2015 - 10:01

We are happy to announce that the Scopus Conference Expansion Program (CEP) is now complete, exceeding its original goal with over 1,000 conference titles, 6,000 conference events and 400,000 conference papers newly covered in both Scopus and Ei Compendex. The Conference Expansion Program, which ran from 2011-2014, consistently focused on disciplines where the communication of findings at international meetings is especially important, primarily Computer Science and Engineering, boosting the citation levels of researchers in these fields.

Conference coverage currently represents around 15% of the content loaded in Scopus, where it provides an important additional component to the scientific literature. Besides filling gaps in the coverage of conference-oriented disciplines, the influx of CEP coverage helps users to monitor the emergence of new concepts in other subject areas, tracking their passage into formal research papers.

Covering the key period of 2005 to the present, the CEP

2014 – Scopus’ Year in Review

on Mon, 01/05/2015 - 10:07

2014 was a banner year for Scopus featuring great releases, further content expansion for all content types and continuous product improvements based on your feedback. Let’s take a closer look at last year's high points:

  • First, 2014 marked the 10th anniversary of Scopus. Since its launch in 2004, Scopus has grown to become the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature, containing 55 million records and more than 21,000 journals from all major fields.

Watch a visual overview of the last 10 years

Download the Research Trends Special Issue on the 10 years of Scopus

 

  • In combination with our 10 year anniversary, we initiated a site improvement program resulting in the launch of a more streamlined interface. This was followed by a redesign of the Author Profile Page as well as the introduction of a Simplified Chinese user interface and help files (to learn more about this release, check out the full release notes).
  • The independent

Scopus continues to add pre-1996 citations

on Mon, 12/08/2014 - 09:30

In March, we launched the Cited Reference Expansion Program to include cited references in the Scopus database going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. Our goal is to expand the ability for users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and enhance h-indices for those researchers who published pre-1996.

As of November 1st we started re-indexing content and pre-1996 archives with cited references are now loaded on a daily basis. There are currently 500,000+ pre-1996 items with cited references in Scopus. This is having a positive impact on the h-index of senior researchers, making author profiles and h-index counts for these researchers more accurate and complete.

To illustrate this content improvement, we have been tracking the number of total citations and measuring the difference of the h-index for a sample set of authors from various subject areas between June and December.

Research Trends: Special Issue on the 10 years of Scopus

on Fri, 11/21/2014 - 09:49

Since its launch in the fall of 2004, Scopus has established itself as the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed research literature. In honor of the 10th anniversary of Elsevier’s bibliographical database, Research Trends recently published a Special Issue that looks back on these 10 years and illustrates how Scopus can be used in bibliometric studies of trends in the global science system.

For one of the issue’s contributions, Dr. Gali Halevi and Dr. Henk F. Moed conducted a comprehensive search on all Scopus data (limiting the results to full research articles only), coming up with a list of the most frequently cited articles published between 2001 and 2011 in eight main research areas. According to their findings, these were the top cited articles per research area:

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

MEGA4: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) software version 4.0 (2007)

Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 24, No. 8, pp. 1596-1599.

Arts & Humanities

The

Scopus h-index being updated to include content from 1970 to the present

on Thu, 10/23/2014 - 22:08

The Scopus Cited Reference Expansion, announced in March, is well on its way. Our October 23 release saw the expansion of the h-index publication window to 1970. The previous publication window was from 1996 onwards.

As a result, the Scopus Author Profile page may show an increase of the h-index count for some authors. These changes in the h-index count are also visible in the author profile in “Analyze author output” h-index and the Cited by (citations) tab. Moreover, it also expanded the publication window of the “Citation Overview” tool.

Why was this done: The h-index timeframe has been lengthened to 1970 in preparation for the Cited References Expansion project. The first batch of pre-1996 cited references will start appearing in November.

What is the impact to the h-index: Prior to this release the h-index was only calculated using post-1995 publications. Authors that have published work prior to 1996 may now see an increase in their h-index, even though no pre-1996 cited

Release Date: 
October 24 2014

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