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Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references - and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 - 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.


Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American

Release Date: 
November 26 2015

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, an older post about the h-index continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus in the past few years, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index includes citations back to 1970, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the Scopus Feedback Wizard

Scopus continues to add pre-1996 citations

on Mon, 12/08/2014 - 09:30

In March, we launched the Cited Reference Expansion Program to include cited references in the Scopus database going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. Our goal is to expand the ability for users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and enhance h-indices for those researchers who published pre-1996.

As of November 1st we started re-indexing content and pre-1996 archives with cited references are now loaded on a daily basis. There are currently 500,000+ pre-1996 items with cited references in Scopus. This is having a positive impact on the h-index of senior researchers, making author profiles and h-index counts for these researchers more accurate and complete.

To illustrate this content improvement, we have been tracking the number of total citations and measuring the difference of the h-index for a sample set of authors from various subject areas between June and December.

Scopus h-index being updated to include content from 1970 to the present

on Thu, 10/23/2014 - 22:08

The Scopus Cited Reference Expansion, announced in March, is well on its way. Our October 23 release saw the expansion of the h-index publication window to 1970. The previous publication window was from 1996 onwards.

As a result, the Scopus Author Profile page may show an increase of the h-index count for some authors. These changes in the h-index count are also visible in the author profile in “Analyze author output” h-index and the Cited by (citations) tab. Moreover, it also expanded the publication window of the “Citation Overview” tool.

Why was this done: The h-index timeframe has been lengthened to 1970 in preparation for the Cited References Expansion project. The first batch of pre-1996 cited references will start appearing in November.

What is the impact to the h-index: Prior to this release the h-index was only calculated using post-1995 publications. Authors that have published work prior to 1996 may now see an increase in their h-index, even though no pre-1996 cited

Release Date: 
October 24 2014

The Scopus h-index, what's it all about? Part II

on Fri, 05/09/2014 - 14:23

Yesterday we brought you the first of two posts on the h-index. Since many of the questions the Scopus team receives from users are related to the h-index and how it is calculated, we thought it was a worthy topic for two posts. Today's post, Part II, is focused on a specific author and his/her h-index. Thanks again to our guest author Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


Obviously, nobody cares about an h-index for articles about water and ice on Mars; people want to be able to evaluate another author's work! So they'd run a search more like this instead: AU-ID(26643014200) or AU-ID("Baker, Victor R." 26643014200) which would return all articles that were written by Mr. Baker. We get the results, we calculate Citation Overview and we look at the great h-index of 40.

This is a high value for one author.

The Scopus h-index, what’s it all about? Part I

on Thu, 05/08/2014 - 09:27

Many of the questions we receive are related to the h-index. Today we bring you a guest post by Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


The h-index is an index that attempts to measure both the productivity and impact of the published work of a scientist or scholar. In Scopus, the h-index is not a static value; it is calculated live on a set of results each time you look it up. The calculation was suggested by Hirsch and it can be summed up as:

A scientist has an index h if h of his/her Np papers has at least h citations each, and the other (Np h) papers have no more than h citations each.

In Scopus you can calculate it on any set of results; it does not have to be papers belonging to just one author. Just run a random search: TITLE-ABS-KEY(mars water ice), select all results, click View Citation Overview and therein you will see the h-index value for that set (see image).