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Author Profiles

Check, Correct, Submit: How to ensure accuracy in your Scopus Author Profile

on Fri, 06/24/2016 - 00:21

The data behind your Scopus Author Profile informs the outward view of your scholarly information—total number of citations, publication history, h-index—not only in Scopus itself, but across other entities supported by Scopus data. These measures may play a factor in tenure, funding or in other decisions; therefore, it is important to ensure your profile reflects your information correctly.  Despite the sophistication of the algorithmic profiling used by Scopus, algorithms cannot always match all documents to a single profile with 100% accuracy. So, in Scopus, what’s the best way to ensure you get credit where credit is due? Check your Scopus Author profile and submit your feedback.

In her recent webinar, Jessica Kowalski covered Scopus algorithmic profiling along with much more about Scopus author profiles in general. Click on the image below and watch minutes 00:18:37‒00:21:00 to learn more details about algorithmic profiling.

Even if you do not have access to Scopus, you can still

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references - and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 - 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.


Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Physical Society (APS), Karger Publishers, Royal

Release Date: 
November 26 2015

Use Scopus to determine which sources an author cites most

on Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:49

Recently a librarian posted to @Scopus on Twitter about gathering statistics on an author’s citation trends. Here’s a way you can use tools on the Scopus author profile page to determine which sources an author cites most frequently.

  1. Perform an <Author Search> and search for the author of interest
  2. Find the correct author from the results list and click on the author’s name
  3. From the author’s detail page, find the ‘Author History’ box on the right and click on the number next to <References>
  4. This opens the search results window and lists the references the author has cited across his or her publications
  5. Click on <Analyze search results> and open the <Source> tab
  6. Here you’ll not only see a list of the top sources the author references (and number of documents from each source), but you can also use the graph to view even more details, or create a chart in which you can compare journal metric values.
  7. You can also export, print and email the information from the charts

To see this done, watch

5 facts about Scopus and the h-index

on Fri, 05/15/2015 - 23:00

How the h-index in Scopus is calculated and where to find it are popular topics; in fact, an older post about the h-index continues to be among our top viewed and shared content. However, a lot has happened in Scopus in the past few years, making it a good time to re-visit the h-index. Here are 5 facts about Scopus and the h-index:

1.    The h-index is no longer limited to post-1995 data, a result of our Cited Reference Expansion Program.
2.    The h-index includes citations from expanded book coverage (but can be easily excluded from your calculation if desired).
3.    You can calculate the h-index for a single author, multiple authors or even for selected documents.
4.    You can access an h-index  from the author details, the analyze author output and the citation overview pages.
5.    Author self-citations can be excluded from calculating an h-index.

Check your h-index in Scopus. The accuracy of your h-index also depends on the accuracy of your author profile. Use the Scopus Feedback

2014 – Scopus’ Year in Review

on Mon, 01/05/2015 - 10:07

2014 was a banner year for Scopus featuring great releases, further content expansion for all content types and continuous product improvements based on your feedback. Let’s take a closer look at last year's high points:

  • First, 2014 marked the 10th anniversary of Scopus. Since its launch in 2004, Scopus has grown to become the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature, containing 55 million records and more than 21,000 journals from all major fields.

Watch a visual overview of the last 10 years

Download the Research Trends Special Issue on the 10 years of Scopus

 

  • In combination with our 10 year anniversary, we initiated a site improvement program resulting in the launch of a more streamlined interface. This was followed by a redesign of the Author Profile Page as well as the introduction of a Simplified Chinese user interface and help files (to learn more about this release, check out the full release notes).
  • The independent and international Scopus Content

Scopus continues to add pre-1996 citations

on Mon, 12/08/2014 - 09:30

In March, we launched the Cited Reference Expansion Program to include cited references in the Scopus database going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. Our goal is to expand the ability for users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and enhance h-indices for those researchers who published pre-1996.

As of November 1st we started re-indexing content and pre-1996 archives with cited references are now loaded on a daily basis. There are currently 500,000+ pre-1996 items with cited references in Scopus. This is having a positive impact on the h-index of senior researchers, making author profiles and h-index counts for these researchers more accurate and complete.

To illustrate this content improvement, we have been tracking the number of total citations and measuring the difference of the h-index for a sample set of authors from various subject areas between June and December.

Meet the Scopus celebrities

on Thu, 11/27/2014 - 12:10

With a total of 55 million records, Scopus delivers a comprehensive overview of research in the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and the arts and humanities. Inevitably, some of the authors indexed in Scopus are bound to be more popular or have more impact than others.

Certain authors, however, are true celebrities of worldwide fame (achieved, incidentally, not merely on scientific merits). We'd like to introduce you to some of them.

Brian May: Rocking the astrophysics

Apart from being the lead guitarist of celebrated rock group Queen, English musician Brian May also studied physics and mathematics at Imperial College in London. He started his PhD on the motion of interplanetary dust particles in 1970 which, mainly due to musical commitments, he was finally able to complete in September 2007. Asteroid 52665 Brianmay is named in his honour.

See his author profile on Scopus

Natalie Portman: A Star Wars Queen in Harvard

Along with her ballet and modern dance studies,

The Nobel laureates in Scopus

on Thu, 10/30/2014 - 10:23

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes in Medicine, Physics, Chemistry and Economics have all published with Elsevier, making pioneering contributions to science and medicine. We are honored to work with these extraordinary scientists, who have also served as editors, editorial board members or reviewers for different Elsevier journals.

You can discover more about the Nobel laureates and their research by looking at their Author Profiles on Scopus and reading a selection of their output.

Medicine or Physiology

John O'Keefe - click to view his Scopus author profile

May-Britt Moser - click to view her Scopus author profile

Edvard Moser - click to view his Scopus author profile

Read a selection of their research papers

Physics

Isamu Akasaki - click to view his Scopus author profile

Hiroshi Amano - click to view his Scopus author profile

Shuji Nakamura - click to view his Scopus author profile

Read a selection of their research papers

Chemistry

Eric Betzig - click to view his Scopus author profile

Scopus h-index being updated to include content from 1970 to the present

on Thu, 10/23/2014 - 22:08

The Scopus Cited Reference Expansion, announced in March, is well on its way. Our October 23 release saw the expansion of the h-index publication window to 1970. The previous publication window was from 1996 onwards.

As a result, the Scopus Author Profile page may show an increase of the h-index count for some authors. These changes in the h-index count are also visible in the author profile in “Analyze author output” h-index and the Cited by (citations) tab. Moreover, it also expanded the publication window of the “Citation Overview” tool.

Why was this done: The h-index timeframe has been lengthened to 1970 in preparation for the Cited References Expansion project. The first batch of pre-1996 cited references will start appearing in November.

What is the impact to the h-index: Prior to this release the h-index was only calculated using post-1995 publications. Authors that have published work prior to 1996 may now see an increase in their h-index, even though no pre-1996 cited

Release Date: 
October 24 2014

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