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Get to the right information faster with Scopus search results page improvements

on Wed, 03/01/2017 - 03:53

Beginning last September, the look and feel of Scopus has been gradually changing. For a re-cap of what changed in both September and December of last year (including changes to the main search pages), please refer to the following posts:

This month includes changes to the document search result page, including the ability to create unique names when you save a search, making it easier to identify and organize your saved searches. Below is a detailed walk-through covering what has changed.

Note: Click on images to view in full-size. The number callouts on the images correspond with the numbered items below.

Document results page

  1. The total number of document results your search returns now appears in the blue page header, making it easier to see right away
  2. Along with the document results, the following links can also be found in the blue page header:
    1. View Secondary documents (i.e.,
Release Date: 
March 2 2017

A/B testing: Making Scopus Better (Part I)

on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:45

How are changes to Scopus determined, and how does your use of Scopus impact the development process? This post is the first of a two-part series in which we discuss A/B testing and how data analysis is

helping us improve Scopus.

There are multiple ways the Scopus team works to identify potential product changes, with a focus to bring you the best experience and provide information faster and with deeper insights. From listening to user feedback to investigating new technology and trends, the product team continuously works to both iterate on existing features and functionality and develop new enhancements.

For an A&I database like Scopus, which serves researchers, institutions, and corporations from all over the world with timely information from over 5000 publishers, there is not a single “typical” user. Each individual user has a specific need and an ideal way they would like the product to work.

Scopus and web accessibility

on Wed, 12/03/2014 - 11:00

Held annually on December 3rd the International Day of People with Disabilities (IDPwD) is a United Nations-sanctioned day that aims to increase public awareness and promote the understanding of disability issues. This year one of the focus areas of IDPwD is the role of technology in creating enabling working environments.

Accessibility features in Scopus

At Elsevier we consistently and proactively work to make our products accessible to all users, regardless of their physical abilities. Accordingly, Scopus features and functions are designed to be accessible by all users and devices, enabling people with disabilities to access Scopus content quickly and easily.

Scopus takes a continuous improvement approach to web accessibility, testing new and existing pages for accessibility with each product release. Some of the accessibility features of Scopus include:

  • All primary functions in Scopus are operable using keyboard only, with logical tab orde.

  • Search result pages show obvious highlighting

Scopus interface improvements released Saturday, September 6

on Mon, 09/08/2014 - 08:46

Since launching a more streamlined interface in February, the Scopus Team has been working on additional site developments that include enhancing Scopus analysis tools as well as improving ORCID functionality.

Taking a close look at the Scopus analysis tools, the team made some changes that better support day-to-day research tasks. As a result all analysis tools have been redesigned to provide a more consistent experience across Scopus. Specifically, these 3 tools have been improved and renamed and now include new features such as the option to export charts and graphs.

Old Scopus name

New Scopus name

Location on Scopus

Analyze Results

Analyze Search Results

Document Search Result page

Author Evaluator

Analyze Author Output

Author Details page

Analyze Journals

Compare Journals

Main search page

 

 
New Analyze Search Results illustrating documents by subject area:

 

 

New Analyze Author Output with

Release Date: 
September 6 2014

The Scopus h-index, what's it all about? Part II

on Fri, 05/09/2014 - 14:23

Yesterday we brought you the first of two posts on the h-index. Since many of the questions the Scopus team receives from users are related to the h-index and how it is calculated, we thought it was a worthy topic for two posts. Today's post, Part II, is focused on a specific author and his/her h-index. Thanks again to our guest author Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


Obviously, nobody cares about an h-index for articles about water and ice on Mars; people want to be able to evaluate another author's work! So they'd run a search more like this instead: AU-ID(26643014200) or AU-ID("Baker, Victor R." 26643014200) which would return all articles that were written by Mr. Baker. We get the results, we calculate Citation Overview and we look at the great h-index of 40.

This is a high value for one author.

The Scopus h-index, what’s it all about? Part I

on Thu, 05/08/2014 - 09:27

Many of the questions we receive are related to the h-index. Today we bring you a guest post by Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


The h-index is an index that attempts to measure both the productivity and impact of the published work of a scientist or scholar. In Scopus, the h-index is not a static value; it is calculated live on a set of results each time you look it up. The calculation was suggested by Hirsch and it can be summed up as:

A scientist has an index h if h of his/her Np papers has at least h citations each, and the other (Np h) papers have no more than h citations each.

In Scopus you can calculate it on any set of results; it does not have to be papers belonging to just one author. Just run a random search: TITLE-ABS-KEY(mars water ice), select all results, click View Citation Overview and therein you will see the h-index value for that set (see image).