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Scopus will no longer support Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) beginning November 3, 2016

on Tue, 10/25/2016 - 23:25

As of November 3 2016, Scopus will no longer support Internet Explorer 9 (IE9). In January 2016, Microsoft announced its official discontinuation of Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 (more information can be found on Microsoft’s support page).

Scopus is in the process of improving its workflow by updating its user interface to the latest technology, HTML5. Scopus aims to provide the best possible user experience, utilizing the most effective tools and most powerful technology. Moving from older technologies to support new ones enables us to improve the performance of the product and develop a better user experience for all our users. Older browsers like IE9 do not support HTML5, the new industry standard for structuring and presenting content for the web. HTML5 supports mobile devices, doesn’t rely on plug-ins, and provides a faster customer experience.

In order for our users to continue benefitting from Scopus’ new features and functionalities, we would like to recommend upgrading

Release Date: 
November 3 2016

Scopus is experiencing an issue with citation counts

on Tue, 10/25/2016 - 21:22

UPDATE: This issue has been resolved. Thank you for your patience!

 

Scopus is experiencing a temporary problem with citation counts. As a result, users may notice discrepancies in the citation counts and h-indices displayed in Scopus.

Is a title indexed in Scopus? A reminder to check before you publish

on Mon, 10/24/2016 - 16:35

“Elsevier has also done extensive work addressing the issue of journals that have been suspended from its research publication database Scopus for inappropriate publishing behaviour – this is an ongoing task that ensures that the papers that we do measure really represent good quality research and those from suspended are not counted.”

Times Higher Education: World University Rankings blog: what’s new for 2016-2017?

This quote is a testament to the positive impact of the independent Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) working with the Scopus Content Product team to ensure that both quality standards and publication practice standards are in place for Scopus. As part of this effort, several initiatives have been adopted over the past two years helping to reinforce that content indexed in Scopus represents “good quality research,” and that underperforming titles (as determined by the CSAB re-evaluation process), or titles for which concerns have been raised, are

Accelerate academic research using Scopus APIs

on Fri, 10/07/2016 - 18:03

Did you know Scopus data can be used to help facilitate your research and be integrated in your published work? Scopus data has been used to help researchers:

  • Analyze cited-by counts across specific, singular academic disciplines
  • Study relationships between authors’ geographic locations and academic affiliations
  • Analyze the relationship of citing works from a limited set of publications
  • And more.

To make this easier and more efficient, you can now obtain a Scopus API key for free and without having to seek permission — provided you are affiliated with a subscribing institution and using the data in support of academic research.To get an idea of how others are using Scopus data in their published work, run a search in Scopus using: “Scopus data”.  

Click on images to enlarge

What you need to know about Scopus APIs

The Elsevier Developer Portal is a self-service site.

A new look for Scopus

on Thu, 09/29/2016 - 02:32

Have you seen Scopus lately? If so, then you probably noticed the refreshed look. If not, then we encourage you to go and open Scopus now. Aside from the more modern look and feel, there are also some functional changes we would like to bring to your attention.To help quickly bring you up to speed, here is a side-by-side comparison between the former version and how it looks today (click on the images to enlarge).

  1. The Scopus home page (Scopus.com) still opens to the search form; however, if you are looking for your ‘Alerts’ and ‘Lists,’ you’ll now find them in the header. If you don’t use ‘Alerts’ and ‘Lists,’ perhaps now is a good time to register and try them out.

  1. To browse and explore content sources in Scopus (i.e., journals, books, conference proceedings, trade publications), you’ll now find that the former ‘Browse Sources’ link has moved to the page header and is called ‘Sources.’ If you want to compare journals across multiple performance metrics, look for the ‘Compare
Release Date: 
September 28 2016
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Maintenance planned for Scopus on September 21, 2016

on Sun, 09/18/2016 - 21:34

Update: This planned maintenance was completed at 2:00 PM EDT. All Scopus features are back to normal. Thank your for your patience!

Please be advised that on September 21, 2016 the Scopus team will be performing maintenance on Scopus beginning at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time (16:00 UTC) and lasting 2 hours. During this time, Scopus will continue to be available in a read-only interface; meaning, Scopus will still be accessible and function as normal with the exception of saving and modifying searches; creating and modifying alerts; and adding items to or updating any saved lists. We ask that you please note the maintenance time and avoid using any of the customizable features during this period.

Release Date: 
September 21 2016

Journal Metrics in Scopus: Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

on Tue, 09/13/2016 - 01:54

Last month, we began a series of posts looking at some of the metrics featured in Library Connect’s Quick Reference Cards for Research Impact Metrics and sharing how they relate to Scopus. The first post covered SCImago Journal Rank (SJR). Continuing on with the journal metrics theme, today we take a look at Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP).

SNIP was created by Professor Henk Moed at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CTWS), University of Leiden. It measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field, using Scopus data.

Or, as stated by the CTWS, “SNIP corrects for differences in citation practices between scientific fields, thereby allowing for more accurate between-field comparisons of citation impact.” (http://www.journalindicators.com/)

As shared in the quick reference card displayed, SNIP is derived by taking a journal’s citation count per paper and dividing it by the citation potential in

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