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Scopus launches annual journal re-evaluation process to maintain content quality

on Wed, 05/06/2015 - 08:26

Since Scopus’ launch in 2004, more than 56 million records have been added to the database. The content originally came from different sources (in-house databases like Embase, ScienceDirect and Compendex, the Scopus Title Suggestion Form and Medline) and has undergone different levels of Scopus content evaluation. This, together with the fact that the title evaluation criteria have evolved over time to become more strict, has led to a situation where some journals no longer meet the Scopus quality criteria.

As high content quality is very important to Scopus, and as an incentive for journals to maintain their high content quality, the title re-evaluation process has been implemented. Six quality metrics and benchmarks have been put in place which are the basis of the re-evaluation process, please find them in the below table. These criteria have been developed with the Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board in conjunction with our Analytical Services team.

Journals not meeting the

Scopus touches base with publishers at the London Book Fair

on Wed, 04/22/2015 - 09:33

Each April the London Book Fair presents a great opportunity for Elsevier’s Publishing Relations team to catch up with all the third party publishers that make their content available to Scopus.

Meeting face-to-face with these publishers provides a wonderful chance to show them how Scopus is evolving, how their content is accepted and represented in Scopus, and to discuss ongoing business.

During last week’s 3-day Book Fair, we sat down with publishers such as Springer, Oxford University Press, Wiley Blackwell and Taylor & Francis to provide them with an update on their books being included in Scopus.

Furthermore, we talked to publishers who potentially wish to join this successful books initiative as well as those who wish to participate in other ongoing Scopus initiatives, like the journal archives and the cited references expansion project.

All in all, a most enjoyable and very fruitful visit!

 


  This post was contributed by:

  Merel Baazil

 

Chrome 42 issues with Scopus Document Download Manager

on Thu, 04/16/2015 - 13:17

The latest version of Chrome, version 42, has switched the Java plugin off by default. If you have upgraded to Chrome 42 and you are unable to download documents on Scopus please follow the steps below to reactivate the Java plugin. This is a temporary solution while we work on a better long term solution. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Enabling NPAPI in Chrome to download documents with DDM

1. Type “chrome://flags/#enable-npapi” into the Chrome address bar.

2. Click the “Enable” link under ‘Enable NPAPI’:

3. Restart Chrome.

4. Open www.scopus.com , make a search, on the search results page select documents to download, click “Download”.

5. Though NPAPI is enabled, Java plug-in maybe blocked as under:

6. If so, click on the Yellow block & the following will show up:

7. Select the 1st

Case Study: Scopus improves product development outcomes

on Tue, 04/14/2015 - 13:44

Scopus is the choice of preference for more than 3,000 academic, government and corporate institutions. This is what James, a research pathologist for a medical device manufacturer who works with Scopus on a regular basis, told us about his experience.

James is an experienced research pathologist for a medical device manufacturer, busy with at least 10 projects at any given time. His contribution to product development ranges from shaping early stage proof-of-concept work to preparations for submission to regulatory authorities. The common denominator for him is to understand disease states and product impacts on the body.

James spends about 20% of his time on large, breakthrough innovation projects on a team dedicated to uncovering new ideas. The product innovation process starts with discussing approaches and capabilities for addressing a problem.

Transforming intelligent research into Research Intelligence

on Fri, 04/10/2015 - 08:41

Not only is Scopus the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed research literature; it is also the backbone of Elsevier Research Intelligence (ERI) solutions, including SciVal and Analytical services.

A comprehensive portfolio of research management solutions, Elsevier Research Intelligence enables you to assess research strengths and make informed decisions at each stage of the research lifecycle.

To find out more about Elsevier’s solutions for research management, check out our newly released video.


Learn more about ERI products and services

Learn more about specific research intiatives supported by Elsevier

Get deeper insights from your Scopus search results with SciVal’s new release

on Wed, 04/08/2015 - 12:41

SciVal’s April release brings with it a number of improvements to help you analyze more deeply and share your work more easily with your institutional peers, further enhancing the seamless integration between Scopus and SciVal.

Some of the new enhancements include:

  • Get instant performance snapshots of your Publication Sets in the Overview module, including the ones that you can create using your Scopus search results

  • Further analyze the Publication Set to see the top researchers, institutions, publications and more

  • Analyze the impact of the Publication Set in the Benchmarking module

  • Easily view the performance of any Scopus journal classification


To learn more about the release, register now for one of the free webinars:

SciVal April Release 2015 - APAC & EMEA Session Register

SciVal April Release 2015 - EMEA & Americas Session Register

Scopus Content update: 75,000 book titles and counting

on Mon, 03/30/2015 - 13:53

"If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads." — Ralph Waldo Emerson, Letters and Social Aims (1876), Quotation and Originality.

With more than 75,000 additional book titles now indexed in Scopus (and another 45,000 planned for 2015), it is easier to uncover the bounty of literature supporting great intellect. 

The arts and humanities and social sciences represent more than 55% of the 75,000 titles (see graph below). Not surprising considering 80% of arts and humanities and social sciences output is published in books instead of journals (1).

In a 2013 Research Trends article, Dr.

Pages