Skip directly to content


Nurses rock! Scopus CSAB Subject Chair Karen Holland on Nursing

on Wed, 05/07/2014 - 15:34

In honor of National Nurses Week in the US and International Nurses Day on May 12, we bring you a guest post from Karen Holland, Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board Chair for Nursing, Health Professions and Education.

ElsevierConnect has developed a dedicated page to celebrate Nurses where you can find regular content for and by nurses; opportunities such as the upcoming Superheroes of Nursing contest, and special features just for this Nurses Week such as the below video and free access to top-cited research in Elsevier's nursing journals.



To all of our valued nurses, nursing educators, nursing students, nursing researchers, and individuals who support the nursing profession: Thank you so much for all of the hard work and dedication that you put in day in and day out that helps improve the lives of so many.

Happy Nurses Week from your friends at

Scopus content update: Books Expansion Project

on Mon, 04/07/2014 - 13:19

In mid-2013 Scopus launched the Books Expansion Project to increase the Arts and Humanities content in Scopus and the project has been steadily moving along. To date, you can see more than 30,000 books in Scopus!

How do we select books to index? The selection policy for books content is on a publisher level (no individual book suggestions are considered), taking into account aspects such as: reputation of publisher, size and subject area of books list, availability and format of book content, publication policy and editorial mission and quality of published books content. Full bibliographic metadata will be indexed as well as abstracts (where available), author and affiliation information and cited references.

  1. Subject areas: Focus on Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities, but also Science, Technology & Medicine (STM)
  2. Coverage years: Back to 2005 (2003 for A&H)
  3. Number of books: 75,000 by the end of 2015; 10,000 each year thereafter
  4. Book types: Monographs, edited volumes, major reference

Scopus content update: the Arts & Humanities

on Mon, 03/31/2014 - 15:20

Scopus turns 10 this year (!) and we are doing a bit of looking back – and looking forward – to see how the database has grown from both a user and content perspective. One area that we thought would be interesting to focus on is the specific improvements Scopus has made in the coverage of the Arts & Humanities; below is a brief overview of a few content enhancement projects.


In 2008, Scopus covered approximately 2,000 Humanities titles. In 2009, to further increase the number of Humanities titles in the database, project MUSE and the initial ERIH list were used to identify additional relevant titles that could be reviewed via the Scopus Title Evaluation Process (STEP).


A similar content expansion project was undertaken in which the coverage of the revised ERIH list, the Social Science Citation Index, the Arts & Humanities Citation Index, the titles list of Evaluation Agency for Research and Evaluation, France (AERES), and the Humanities journal indexes Cairns and

Scopus to add cited references for pre-1996 content

on Thu, 03/27/2014 - 10:22

If anyone in our Amsterdam office sits near the Scopus team they may have overheard us tossing out numbers such as “1970”, “8 million” and “1996”. What do these numbers have in common exactly? They are all integral to the Scopus Cited References Expansion program which launched earlier this month and will (begin to) become evident with the Scopus interface in the fourth quarter of 2014.

The Scopus team is thrilled to officially announce the launch of the Scopus Cited References Expansion project. After extensive evaluation of feedback from the research community, internal discussion and operational documentation, our content team successfully made the investment case to include cited references in the Scopus database – going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content!

The Cited References Expansion project aims to increase the depth of Scopus’ scholarly content while enhancing the ability to use Scopus for evaluation and trend analysis. Moreover, author profiles and h-index counts of

Scopus, Spinoza and the Arts & Humanities

on Mon, 03/17/2014 - 13:21

Increasingly people are aware that Scopus is by far the largest scholarly database for the humanities. Out of 8,000 active journals and book series titles in the social sciences 2,600 are in Arts & Humanities. Next to that our books expansion program is beginning to show impressive numbers with thousands of monographs also being indexed in Scopus.

But perhaps less well known is that the influence of Arts & Humanities is also noticeable in other fields. Let’s have a look at this and take as case in point the works of Benedict de Spinoza, who was born almost four hundred years ago actually not that far from our office here in Amsterdam. He wrote on many philosophical topics such as politics and psychology and has been credited for pre-empting the Enlightenment . He even wrote on the concept of “scopus” (an intended goal)! Einstein once said that if he believed in a god it would be the god of Spinoza.

If you search for Spinoza in Scopus you will get an impressive list of records: 219 in

Scopus celebrates Pi Day

on Fri, 03/14/2014 - 00:33

Happy Pi day! 3.14159 (or the number otherwise known as Pi or π) is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. This irrational number has long intrigued mathematicians and has even found a place in pop culture with its own holiday. Even our friends at ElsevierConnect have written about it today.

Pi appears throughout history. From Antiquity (there’s debate about if the Giza Pyramid builders had knowledge of Pi), to ancient Greek, Chinese, Indian and Persian mathematicians (including Archimedes, Liu Hui, Aryabhata and Jamshīd al-Kāshī), to 17th and 18th century European mathematicians and into the modern computer age.

So let’s talk about Scopus’ math content. An Advanced search for SUBJAREA(MATH) yields more than 2.1M results. 2.114221 to be precise (search executed 3/14/2014). Refining the initial search using the limiter “pi” narrows the results to 40,402 documents.

By clicking on “Analyze results” you can see more detail about these 40,402 records including popular

Meeting of the minds: Scopus' CSAB meets next week

on Fri, 10/25/2013 - 14:05

Twice a year the Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) comes together for a few days to discuss and make decisions regarding Scopus' content and content policies. Our next meeting starts next Wednesday and we are looking forward to discussing topics such as: publication ethics, content type expansion and ongoing content development programs, the overall review and acceptance process, and much more. I can vouch that these discussions are both lively and fruitful for all involved. And as Scopus' product marketing manager, I have the opportunity to present -- and get feedback on -- our new UI launching in January (more to come in subsequent blog posts), our new info site home on, and general marketing strategy. Plus, I get to listen to the dynamic debates. This group is never at a loss for ideas and it is invigorating for the Scopus team to see how dedicated they are to Scopus' success and to the pursuit of science.  

So what is the CSAB exactly?

Books, books and more books: Scopus’ Titles Expansion Program

on Wed, 10/09/2013 - 13:15

In conjunction with the Frankfurt Book Fair, we’ve formally announced the Scopus Book Titles Expansion program. Our content operations team has been actively processing books since the Spring and as of our August release books content – at the book and chapter level – has been visible in Scopus’ interface. To date, we have 7,654 books visible (20,000 by the end of the year) and expect to fully index 75,000 books by the end of the project.

So why has Scopus decided to add books? We know that various content types – journals, conference proceedings and books – contribute, through citation activity, to the evaluation of scholarly research and the evaluation of researchers. And in specific scientific fields, each content type may hold different weight. For example, a computer scientist (as our subject chair for Computer Science from the Scopus Content Selection Board (CSAB) has told us time and time again) will more frequently publish in conference proceedings whereas a social scientist

Release Date: 
August 24 2013