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Based on Scopus data, SRC launches '2016 Best Chinese University Ranking' report

on Mon, 02/22/2016 - 12:38

We are pleased to announce that the recently-released "2016 Best Chinese University Ranking" report, based on evaluation by the ShanghaiRanking Consultancy (SRC), is again using Scopus data and metrics from SciVal.

The report provides a detailed look at key research performance indicators for more than 1,000 higher education institutions across mainland China. The ranking offers research management offices and higher education agencies an objective benchmarking of the research performance of higher education institutions. It also provides them with another set of metrics with which to strategically assess policy development and investments towards building the research capabilities of these universities.

In addition to ShanghaiRanking Consultancy, Elsevier also provides Scopus data and SciVal analytics to Times Higher Education's World University Ranking, QS' Top Universities Ranking, US News & World Report's Arab Region Ranking, Financial Times' MBA Ranking and Maclean’s Canadian

Everything you need to know about Scopus content but didn’t know to ask

on Mon, 02/08/2016 - 22:23

In last month’s webinar the Scopus team brought you an overview of Scopus. This month, Dr. Wim Meester, Head of Scopus Product Management, joins us to bring a more in depth look at Scopus content and how it is relevant to you. From journals to books to conference papers, how is content selected for Scopus and how does it bring you a full view of what’s happening in your research world? Look to learn more about Scopus content curation and the high quality standards each title must meet and retain in order to be included.

If you have questions about what is and is not included in Scopus, how far back content goes, what the coverage is for your area of interest, or how Scopus content coverage impacts author and article-level metrics, this webinar is for you.                                         

Dr. Meester will also share practical tips and tricks to help you get more from Scopus content.

More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

More content, more features, more to learn. Monthly webinars help you get more from Scopus

on Thu, 01/07/2016 - 18:43

Join expert-led webinars monthly and improve your Scopus experience

The start of a new year is often a time of making resolutions, beginning new endeavors, re-evaluating and setting new goals. It’s a time to reflect on the past year and move forward — ideally toward a better and brighter path. One of the new paths the Scopus team is taking this year is to introduce an ongoing webinar program. Nearly every month, one of the Scopus team members will host a topical webinar to bring you more insight into the product, not only to improve your experience with it but also to answer questions about its content, capabilities and vision.

So, no matter what your New Year’s resolutions are — to work more efficiently, to find the most relevant content, to track or measure research impact, or even if you don’t make resolutions — join us regularly to learn something new about Scopus and build your knowledge and understanding about what it can

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 1: More content, but not at the expense of quality

on Mon, 12/14/2015 - 20:26

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over the next 3 days we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post will cover a different focus. This post, part 1, covers content expansion and quality. The next post, part 2, discusses features and functionality. And the final post, part 3, will look at data partnerships.  

In terms of content, Scopus has been growing exponentially (reaching over 60 million by the end of December), but this is not at the expense of quality. Here are 3 things to know about what’s changed for Scopus content in 2015:

1.) CSAB implements additional content quality measures. High content quality has always been important to Scopus and why the independent Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) was established in 2005. The board already maintains and follows a robust selection policy for any

Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references - and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 - 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.

Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American

Release Date: 
November 26 2015

Scopus book expansion project nearly complete

on Fri, 11/13/2015 - 14:03

This week the first ever #Academic Book Week is happening throughout the UK and beyond. Academic Book Week is a series of events, competitions, promotions and social media activity, all taking place from November 9-16, 2015.

Why does Scopus care about books? Increased coverage of Scopus book content provides researchers, especially those working in book-based disciplines, a broader frame of reference to complement what is published in primary research journals. It also allows for bibliometric and citation analysis of that content.

When we started the Book Title Expansion Project, we originally aimed to add 75,000 new books – a number that was already reached in February this year. By the end of this year Scopus will have indexed 120,000 book titles! And when the project formally ends this year, we will continue to invest in books content in order to index an additional 20,000 titles per year.

Publishers and content covered in the Books Expansion Project
The books that are added to

Release Date: 
November 13 2015

Scopus chosen by Maclean’s magazine to enhance university rankings

on Tue, 10/27/2015 - 14:55

We’re pleased to announce that Maclean's magazine is using Scopus data to enhance their annual ranking of Canadian universities. The rankings, which focus on Canadian institutions’ academic research and overall accomplishments, will now use research data and metrics from Scopus and SciVal.

The ranking methodology weighs factors that measure research productivity and performance, using a variety of bibliometric indicators such as publications and citations. Elsevier will provide data on the research publication output in 10 subject areas for a pre-determined list of 60 Canadian Universities. The subject areas include education, nursing, business and biology.

“Maclean’s chose Elsevier for the depth and breadth of its Scopus data base, as well as its experience working with other publications on rankings,” said Kim Honey, editor of special issues. “We’re excited to introduce our very first rankings by subject, and we have Elsevier to thank for that.”

Scopus’ position on rankings is

Three ways to search for open access journals in Scopus

on Mon, 08/03/2015 - 21:32

On July 29, 2015 Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator for journals indexed in Scopus. The indicator allows users to easily identify open access journals within Scopus via the ‘Browse Sources’ link. This link provides an alphabetical list of all journals, book series, trade publications and conference proceedings available in Scopus.

How to search for open access journals in Scopus:

Navigate to the ‘Browse Sources’ tab in Scopus and choose from the following options to search for open access journals (or watch the video below):

Option 1 (see image 1 below)

  • In the Browse box, click on the drop-down menu next to ‘Subject Area’ to select your subject area of choice
  • Also in the Browse box, tick the 'Open Access' check box: ‘Display only Open Access Journals’
  • Click on ‘Display Sources.’ This search will yield only open access journals which cover your search topic
  • Open access journals are indicated with an orange open access label

Image 1: Options in ‘Browse Sources’ to search for open

Breaking the 1996 barrier: Scopus adds nearly 4 million pre-1996 articles and more than 83 million references

on Mon, 07/20/2015 - 13:53

Scopus data has been growing exponentially over the last year — and perhaps not in the way you might expect. In the last 7 months, Scopus has added over 83 million pre-1996 cited references to nearly 4 million articles.

Currently, the average number of references per pre-1996 article is 22.9.

This has been achieved in two ways; by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles, and by adding article back files, including their cited references, from the archives of 36 major publishers, going back to 1970. Keep in mind that this is only the beginning. By the end of 2016 we anticipate that these numbers will grow to approximately 12 million* complete records for pre-1996 articles, contributing more than 150 million cited references. This is on top of the 1 billion plus references already included in Scopus today.

* Note: We expect to reach 10 million records by the end of this year.

What does this mean for