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Scopus changes RIS tags used for export

on Mon, 06/02/2014 - 08:17

We have changed some of the RIS tags to better support the most popular reference managers. As a result, some data is not exporting to specific reference managers -- EndNote, for example -- while it was before the May 31 release.

If you were using a translation filter before 31 May 2014, you may not need it anymore; please try a direct RIS export from Scopus. If you have created your own mapping of Scopus fields in the reference manager, please use this updated RIS field document to adjust the mapping. In case of any doubt, you can also export RIS files from Scopus to any text editor to see the tag names.

Please Note: We are unable to assist you with the specific configuration within your reference manager. If you require help with configuration, you will need to contact the respective vendor. Should you have any other Scopus-related problems with the export, please let us know by contacting your local helpdesk.

Release Date: 
May 31 2014

Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board Meeting Next Week

on Thu, 05/29/2014 - 14:10

Twice a year the independent and international Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) comes together to make decisions regarding Scopus' content and content policies. Our next meeting starts Wednesday in Amsterdam and will coincide with the launch of Scopus' 10 Year celebration. Check out what I last wrote about the work they do.

In addtion to the usual discussion topics: publication ethics, review processes and ongoing content projects such as the Scopus Books Expansion program and the Cited References Expansion program, Board members will get to meet more of the people who work on Scopus! From customer support to market development to the Elsevier Research Intelligence analytics team, I know that the presentations and discussions will be engaging and lively.

So what is the CSAB exactly and what do they do? The Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board is an international group of scientists, researchers and librarians who each represent a major scientific discipline.

The Scopus h-index, what's it all about? Part II

on Fri, 05/09/2014 - 14:23

Yesterday we brought you the first of two posts on the h-index. Since many of the questions the Scopus team receives from users are related to the h-index and how it is calculated, we thought it was a worthy topic for two posts. Today's post, Part II, is focused on a specific author and his/her h-index. Thanks again to our guest author Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


Obviously, nobody cares about an h-index for articles about water and ice on Mars; people want to be able to evaluate another author's work! So they'd run a search more like this instead: AU-ID(26643014200) or AU-ID("Baker, Victor R." 26643014200) which would return all articles that were written by Mr. Baker. We get the results, we calculate Citation Overview and we look at the great h-index of 40.

This is a high value for one author.

The Scopus h-index, what’s it all about? Part I

on Thu, 05/08/2014 - 09:27

Many of the questions we receive are related to the h-index. Today we bring you a guest post by Meshna Koren, Second Line Support Manager for Scopus (also known as "she who knows all about Scopus").


The h-index is an index that attempts to measure both the productivity and impact of the published work of a scientist or scholar. In Scopus, the h-index is not a static value; it is calculated live on a set of results each time you look it up. The calculation was suggested by Hirsch and it can be summed up as:

A scientist has an index h if h of his/her Np papers has at least h citations each, and the other (Np h) papers have no more than h citations each.

In Scopus you can calculate it on any set of results; it does not have to be papers belonging to just one author. Just run a random search: TITLE-ABS-KEY(mars water ice), select all results, click View Citation Overview and therein you will see the h-index value for that set (see image).

Nurses rock! Scopus CSAB Subject Chair Karen Holland on Nursing

on Wed, 05/07/2014 - 15:34

In honor of National Nurses Week in the US and International Nurses Day on May 12, we bring you a guest post from Karen Holland, Scopus Content Selection & Advisory Board Chair for Nursing, Health Professions and Education.

ElsevierConnect has developed a dedicated page to celebrate Nurses where you can find regular content for and by nurses; opportunities such as the upcoming Superheroes of Nursing contest, and special features just for this Nurses Week such as the below video and free access to top-cited research in Elsevier's nursing journals.


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Description: 

To all of our valued nurses, nursing educators, nursing students, nursing researchers, and individuals who support the nursing profession: Thank you so much for all of the hard work and dedication that you put in day in and day out that helps improve the lives of so many.

Happy Nurses Week from your friends at

Behind the scenes: the Scopus product team (V)

on Tue, 05/06/2014 - 12:03

To round out our series on "who are the people that work on Scopus?" we present you with the Product Marketing team. We're also the people behind this blog and Scopus' social media accounts. If you'd like to get in contact with us, please send an email to Scopus Marketing and we'll get back to you quickly.

Pierre van Doorn,  Marketing Enablement Manager

What is your role on the Scopus team?

I’m responsible for communicating all Scopus product releases to our users and customers. It is essential to keep our users and customers informed on what kind of functionality and content we continue to add to the product. We want users to be able to use Scopus to the fullest. Communication is essential in making them aware of how Scopus can help them in their work. I also make sure that our global sales team is up to date on Scopus and all it has to offer our customers.

What is your favorite part about working on Scopus (and at Elsevier!)?

I

Scopus to test new system in order to improve speed

on Fri, 04/25/2014 - 12:47

Starting May 19, Scopus will test a method of selective internet routing to speed up delivery of our pages to customers. Most customers will see an improvement in speed. However, some customers with unusual internet configurations may experience a problem. If you are suddenly unable to access Scopus as before, this may be due to incompatibility with the new routing method.

If you suddenly lose access to Scopus, please first check that the above is indeed the reason for the problem by trying the following URL: www2.scopus.com. This should give you direct access to the original Scopus IP address as before the test.  If you now have access again, then you will need to follow the steps below to restore normal service.

While we help you fix the problem, your users can continue to use Scopus via a workaround using www2.scopus.com. This may occasionally require them to change the URL – adding a 2 after www – for some links.

IP white listing is the problem

The problem is expected to arise

Release Date: 
May 19 2014

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