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A/B testing: Making Scopus Better (Part I)

on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:45

How are changes to Scopus determined, and how does your use of Scopus impact the development process? This post is the first of a two-part series in which we discuss A/B testing and how data analysis is helping us improve Scopus.

There are multiple ways the Scopus team works to identify potential product changes, with a focus to bring you the best experience and provide information faster and with deeper insights. From listening to user feedback to investigating new technology and trends, the product team continuously works to both iterate on existing features and functionality and develop new enhancements.

For an A&I database like Scopus, which serves researchers, institutions, and corporations from all over the world with timely information from over 5000 publishers, there is not a single “typical” user. Each individual user has a specific need and an ideal way they would like the product to work.

How to discover key influencers and uncover trends from your Scopus search results

on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 07:28

Scopus indexes over 120,000 book titles; and, by using the <Analyze search results> tool in Scopus in tandem with searching book content, you can gain a powerful way of discovering key influencers and uncovering important trends. To demonstrate how this works, watch our video or follow the steps below:

 

 

For this example, let’s say you are looking to find broad-based content and subject area experts on economic behavior. Note: click on each image to enlarge

  1. Begin a search in Scopus for Economic Behavior

  1. The search returns over 69,000 document results. To make this a less intimidating number and isolate only book content, filter your results to <Books> on the left hand side, under the <Document type> parameter; and click on <Limit to>

  1. Next, sort by <Cited by> to quickly identify the most impactful books
  2. Begin scrolling through the list and click on <Show abstract> to read more about a book and decide whether it is relevant to your research needs

  1. Once you isolate a book that both relevant to

Scopus surpasses 120,000 indexed book titles!

on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 19:35

Scopus has now surpassed its targeted goal of 120,000 books indexed since the Scopus Book Titles Expansion program was first announced, marking the conclusion of the project (10,000 books will continue to be added annually). Reflecting back on the original goal, this is 45,000 more books than initially planned. Additionally, over 60% of the indexed books fall into the arts and humanities and/or social sciences categories, achieving a key objective to better support the book-based nature of these disciplines.

Search for a book in Scopus

To view a list of all books now indexed in Scopus, download the latest books title list.

You can sort the list by publisher, publication year, discipline and search by ISBN.

What defines a book in Scopus? Books are indexed on both a book and a chapter level. Book selection policy is publisher-based, meaning publishers are reviewed based on the relevancy and quality of their complete books list.

Everything you need to know about Scopus content but didn’t know to ask

on Mon, 02/08/2016 - 22:23

In last month’s webinar the Scopus team brought you an overview of Scopus. This month, Dr. Wim Meester, Head of Scopus Product Management, joins us to bring a more in depth look at Scopus content and how it is relevant to you. From journals to books to conference papers, how is content selected for Scopus and how does it bring you a full view of what’s happening in your research world? Look to learn more about Scopus content curation and the high quality standards each title must meet and retain in order to be included.

If you have questions about what is and is not included in Scopus, how far back content goes, what the coverage is for your area of interest, or how Scopus content coverage impacts author and article-level metrics, this webinar is for you.                                         

Dr. Meester will also share practical tips and tricks to help you get more from Scopus content.

More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Identifying open access content in lists

A note

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

More content, more features, more to learn. Monthly webinars help you get more from Scopus

on Thu, 01/07/2016 - 18:43

Join expert-led webinars monthly and improve your Scopus experience

The start of a new year is often a time of making resolutions, beginning new endeavors, re-evaluating and setting new goals. It’s a time to reflect on the past year and move forward — ideally toward a better and brighter path. One of the new paths the Scopus team is taking this year is to introduce an ongoing webinar program. Nearly every month, one of the Scopus team members will host a topical webinar to bring you more insight into the product, not only to improve your experience with it but also to answer questions about its content, capabilities and vision.

So, no matter what your New Year’s resolutions are — to work more efficiently, to find the most relevant content, to track or measure research impact, or even if you don’t make resolutions — join us regularly to learn something new about Scopus and build your knowledge and understanding about what it can do for you.   

First up is "Scopus 2015 review and

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