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Susannah Beatty-Tucker's blog

More ways to discover content from open access journals in Scopus

on Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:12

In July of last year, Scopus launched an open access (OA) indicator to make it easier for users to identify OA journals (click here to read more about Scopus and open access). In the initial release the indicator appeared on the 'Browse sources' and 'Journal details' pages. Now, as of February 4, 2016, the indicator appears in additional Scopus pages to make it easier for you to identify content that comes from an open access title (a journal registered with either the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) or the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ROAD)). These pages are the search results, list pages (temporary and saved lists), and author profile pages. View the images below to see how the indicator works in each page and then follow the tip & trick at the end of this post to learn 3 ways to search for open access journals (updated from this earlier post).

Identifying open access content in the search results page

Release Date: 
February 4 2016

What’s on your profile page? A tip to check and correct your author details

on Mon, 02/01/2016 - 18:17

Inspired by Jessica Kowalski’s recent Scopus webinar, follow this quick tip to check and correct your profile.

During minutes 21‒25 of her webinar, Jessica speaks about the importance of accuracy in author profiles, especially in regards to career management (watch the webinar). Name ambiguity can impact the correct attribution of your work, career advancement and potential collaboration opportunities. For example, your Scopus details page (see example below) includes performance assessments based on the work identified with your name.

As Jessica explains, to display this information, Scopus uses a powerful algorithm to disambiguate a paper and match it to the correct author profile(s). This algorithm analyzes information such as publishing history, author affiliation and co-citation behavior. However, although extremely sophisticated, algorithms can only go so far.

More content, more features, more to learn. Monthly webinars help you get more from Scopus

on Thu, 01/07/2016 - 18:43

Join expert-led webinars monthly and improve your Scopus experience

The start of a new year is often a time of making resolutions, beginning new endeavors, re-evaluating and setting new goals. It’s a time to reflect on the past year and move forward — ideally toward a better and brighter path. One of the new paths the Scopus team is taking this year is to introduce an ongoing webinar program. Nearly every month, one of the Scopus team members will host a topical webinar to bring you more insight into the product, not only to improve your experience with it but also to answer questions about its content, capabilities and vision.

So, no matter what your New Year’s resolutions are — to work more efficiently, to find the most relevant content, to track or measure research impact, or even if you don’t make resolutions — join us regularly to learn something new about Scopus and build your knowledge and understanding about what it can

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 3: A rise in the number of data partnerships

on Wed, 12/16/2015 - 21:17

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over 3 posts, we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post covers a different focus.

Part one focused on Scopus content growth and quality and part 2 looked at product developments changing the way you can find, use and evaluate content. This third post focuses on the continuing trend in growth of data partnerships throughout 2015. While data partnerships may not directly impact everyday use of Scopus, the trend is a noteworthy 2015 highlight. Here is why:

Scopus data underpins important ranking reports. Not unrelated to the progress Scopus has made in content expansion (while still maintaining quality) and in measuring research impact, this year also saw a growing trend in the number of ranking organizations turning to Scopus as their data provider. Why? As explained by Times Higher Education (THE) Managing Director, Trevor

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 2: New tools to help find, use and evaluate content

on Tue, 12/15/2015 - 21:10

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over 3 posts, we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post will cover a different focus.

Part one focused on Scopus content growth and quality. Today, we look at 2015 product developments. In terms of new features introduced this year, two prominent changes stand out — one designed to provide deeper insights into an article’s research impact, and the other to help you identify open access titles.

  • Understanding research impact. In July, Scopus moved away from the altmetric.com and introduced its own metrics module. Why? As shared by Elsevier’s Mike Taylor (Senior Product Manager, Informetrics) in a recent webinar, although the ‘altmetric.com donut’ was engaging, it didn’t quite give you an indication of how an article was performing compared to others.

Scopus 2015 Review, Part 1: More content, but not at the expense of quality

on Mon, 12/14/2015 - 20:26

As 2015 comes to an end, it’s time to reflect upon the year and look at how Scopus has, and will continue to, evolve. Over the next 3 days we share key 2015 Scopus developments and their impact on the researcher. Each post will cover a different focus. This post, part 1, covers content expansion and quality. The next post, part 2, discusses features and functionality. And the final post, part 3, will look at data partnerships.  

In terms of content, Scopus has been growing exponentially (reaching over 60 million by the end of December), but this is not at the expense of quality. Here are 3 things to know about what’s changed for Scopus content in 2015:

1.) CSAB implements additional content quality measures. High content quality has always been important to Scopus and why the independent Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board (CSAB) was established in 2005. The board already maintains and follows a robust selection policy for any

How to use Scopus to identify key opinion leaders in 6 easy steps

on Mon, 12/07/2015 - 17:28

Making sure you can identify partners and key influencers within your research field is an important part of the research process. With Scopus you can quickly and comprehensively track the major research players in your field. For example, looking at the field of oncology, you can determine who the key opinion leaders are in this area by following these 6 easy steps:

  1. Perform a <Document Search> on “oncology”
  2. <Limit> the years to 2013-2015 to ensure you get the most recent research on this area
  3. Click <Analyze search results> and ensure date fields are set to 2013-2015
Figure 1

  1. Compare the document counts of the top authors in the table, and then click on the corresponding line in the bar chart (to the right of the table, see 'step 4' in figure 1) to take a closer look into individual publications (see figure 2 for an example)
Figure 2

  1. Returning to the

Case Study: Improved productivity in pharmaceutical R&D

on Sun, 11/29/2015 - 20:13

The challenges in the pharma industry are well known. A low rate of NCE (new chemical entities) being brought to market; the expensive, timely clinical trial; and stringent regulatory procedures combined put pharma under pressure to increase productivity and carefully select and fulfil unmet medical needs.

In this case study, a health economist and a patent counsel share their thoughts on why Scopus plays an integral role in their strategic marketing and product defense roles. The health economist works in the global product strategy department, looking at pipeline products and benchmarking them against products already in the field, studying new investigations on existing products, and evaluating pharmacoeconomic studies and quality of life issues.

2015 National Academy of Sciences, India (NASI) Scopus Young Scientist Awards

on Tue, 11/03/2015 - 23:31

New Delhi, September 22, 2015Elsevier and the National Academy of Sciences, India (NASI)  announced the winners of the 2015 NASI-Scopus Young Scientist Awards.

Contributed by Manish Uniyal, Marketing Manager

The Scopus Young Scientist Awards were first launched by Elsevier in 2006. In 2009, India officially adopted the program within its scientific community through Elsevier's collaboration with NASI. The program honors young researchers who are building their careers in academic research, helping them gain recognition for their work.

This year’s NASI-Scopus Young Scientist Awards program attracted nearly 650 applications from premier research institutions across India. A panel of 32 subject experts from India's academic community judged the applications, using quantitative analyses from Scopus data provided by Elsevier. Additional criteria the judges used included:

  • Quality and number of publications
  • Nature and

Case Study: Increased competitive advantage in developing functional materials

on Fri, 10/09/2015 - 21:43

At a leading supplier of functional materials, a couple of research engineers shared with us how they use Scopus to save time and increase their competitive advantage in developing advanced functional materials.

Developing attractive new products, improving existing products to better satisfy evolving customer expectations, and upgrading manufacturing processes to be more efficient are the top concerns of this company. Additionally, compliance with the latest environmental and safety regulations is another major factor. Across various divisions, including the glass and ceramics group, Scopus is a reliable tool that enables innovation in a fraction of the time previously spent – the engineers estimate that it made the investigational stage of research 40% more effective, and lowered development time by 20%.

The richness and variety of data available in Scopus enable researchers to vastly speed up the process of basic research.

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